Angharad ferch Llywelyn

F, #102601
Last Edited=10 Apr 2012

Child of Angharad ferch Llywelyn and Maelgwn Fychan ap Maelgwyn, Lord of Ceredigion

Gwenllian ap Llywelyn

F, #102602, b. 1282, d. 1337
Last Edited=25 Oct 2009
     Gwenllian ap Llywelyn was born in 1282. She was the daughter of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, Prince of North Wales and Lady Eleanor de Montfort.1 She died in 1337.
     She was also known as Gwenellian of Wales. She was a nun.

Citations

  1. [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, Prince of North Wales1

M, #102603, b. circa 1223, d. 11 December 1282
Last Edited=25 Oct 2009
     Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, Prince of North Wales was born circa 1223.2 He was the son of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn and Senena ferch Rhodri.2 He married Lady Eleanor de Montfort, daughter of Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester and Eleanor of England, in 1278. He died on 11 December 1282.2
     He succeeded to the title of Prince of Wales in 1246.2

Child of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, Prince of North Wales and Lady Eleanor de Montfort

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 71. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Theobald Bourke, 1st Viscount Mayo1

M, #102604, b. before 1583, d. 18 June 1629
Last Edited=16 Aug 2009
     Theobald Bourke, 1st Viscount Mayo was born at sea before 1583.1 He was the son of Sir Richard Bourke and Grace O'Malley.1 He married Maud Sligo, daughter of Charles O'Connor Sligo. He died on 18 June 1629.1 He was buried at Ballintober, County Mayo, Ireland.2
      Theobald Bourke, 1st Viscount Mayo also went by the nick-name of Tibbot-ny-Lung (or in English, Tibbot of the ships).1 In 1599 he supported the Crown against the Spaniards at Kinsale.1 He was invested as a Knight on 4 January 1602/3 at Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland.1 On 25 September 1603 he surrendered his estates, and obtained a regrant under English tenure.1 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for County Mayo between 1613 and 1615.2 He was created 1st Viscount Mayo [Ireland] on 21 June 1627.1

Children of Theobald Bourke, 1st Viscount Mayo

Child of Theobald Bourke, 1st Viscount Mayo and Maud Sligo

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume VIII, page 604. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume VIII, page 605.
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume VIII, page 607.
  4. [S37] BP2003 volume 1, page 1147. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]

Sir Richard Bourke1

M, #102605
Last Edited=22 Jun 2008
      Sir Richard Bourke also went by the nick-name of Mac William 'Eighter' (or in English, Mac William Lower (i.e Mayo the Lower)).1

Child of Sir Richard Bourke and Grace O'Malley

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume VIII, page 604. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

Ælfræd, King of Wessex1,2

M, #102606, b. between 846 and 849, d. between 25 October 899 and 28 October 899
Last Edited=6 Apr 2007
Alfred the Great, King of England3
     Ælfræd, King of Wessex was born between 846 and 849 at Wantage, Oxfordshire, England.4 He was the son of Æðelwulf, King of Wessex and Osburga (?). He married Eahlwið, Princess of Mercia, daughter of Æthelred 'Mucil', Ealdorman of the Gainas and Eadburga, Princess of Mercia, between 868 and 869.5 He died between 25 October 899 and 28 October 899.6 He was buried at Newminster Abbey, Winchester, Hampshire, England.6
      Ælfræd, King of Wessex also went by the nick-name of Alfred 'the Great' (?).7 He succeeded to the title of King Ælfræd of Wessex on 23 April 871.5 He succeeded to the title of King Ælfræd of Mercia on 23 April 871.5
     He helped his brother gain a great victory over the Danes at Ashdown in 871. Alfred organised the army and was the founder of the English Navy. By 877 the Danes had occupied London and reached Gloucester and Exeter, but they lost 120 supply ships in a fierce storm off Swanage. In 878 he was forced to hide in Somerset and it was there arose the legend of the burned cakes. He renewed the fight and won a famous victory at Edington in Wiltshire the same year. After, the Danes agreed that their king, Guthrum, should be baptised and Alfred was godfather. Afterwards Guthrum ruled Mercia but acknowledged Alfred as Overlord. The Mercian settlement developed over the next 100 years into the body known as Danelaw. Before that, in 879 at Fulham and also near Rochester in 884, other Norse armies landed. Alfred continued fighting until he was the acknowledged champion of the English against the Danes. Alfred was scholarly, a writer, law-maker, pious and also a valiant fighter. Additionally he had a good knowledge of geography. He was a most able administrator and also instituted educational programmes. He founded monasteries and gave a large part of his income to charities.

Children of Ælfræd, King of Wessex and Eahlwið, Princess of Mercia

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 11. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S215] Unknown article title, Journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, Chobham, Surrey, U.K., volume 1, issue 6, page 409. Hereinafter cited as Foundation for Medieval Genealogy.
  3. [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 8.
  5. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 9.
  6. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 10.
  7. [S215] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, volume 1, issue 6, page 407.
  8. [S58] E. B. Fryde, D. E. Greenway, S. Porter and I. Roy, editors, Handbook of British Chronology, 3rd edition (London, U.K.: Royal Historical Society, 1986), page 24. Hereinafter cited as Handbook of British Chronology.
  9. [S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grenville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.


Eahlwið, Princess of Mercia1

F, #102607, b. circa 852, d. 5 December 905
Last Edited=22 Jul 2012
     Eahlwið, Princess of Mercia was born circa 852. She was the daughter of Æthelred 'Mucil', Ealdorman of the Gainas and Eadburga, Princess of Mercia.2 She married Ælfræd, King of Wessex, son of Æðelwulf, King of Wessex and Osburga (?), between 868 and 869.2 She died on 5 December 905 at Winchester, Hampshire, England.2 She was buried at St. Mary's Abbey, Winchester, Hampshire, England.2
     She gained the title of Princess of Mercia. She was a nun circa 901 at St. Mary's Abbey, Winchester, Hampshire, England.2

Children of Eahlwið, Princess of Mercia and Ælfræd, King of Wessex

Citations

  1. [S215] Unknown article title, Journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, Chobham, Surrey, U.K., volume 1, issue 6, page 407. Hereinafter cited as Foundation for Medieval Genealogy.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 9. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  3. [S58] E. B. Fryde, D. E. Greenway, S. Porter and I. Roy, editors, Handbook of British Chronology, 3rd edition (London, U.K.: Royal Historical Society, 1986), page 24. Hereinafter cited as Handbook of British Chronology.
  4. [S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grenville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.
  5. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 10.

Æðelwulf, King of Wessex1

M, #102608, b. between 795 and 810, d. after 13 January 858
Last Edited=3 Dec 2005
     Æðelwulf, King of Wessex was born between 795 and 810.2 He was the son of Ecgbeorht, King of Wessex and Redburga (?).3 He married, firstly, Osburga (?), daughter of Oslac of Hampshire, circa 830.2 He married, secondly, Judith, Princesse de France, daughter of Charles I, Roi de France and Ermentrude d'Orléans, on 1 October 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France.2 He died after 13 January 858.4 He was buried at Winchester Cathedral, Winchester, Hampshire, England.4 He was buried at Steyning, Sussex, England.5
     He gained the title of Subregulus of Kent, Essex, Sussex and Surrey between 825 and 828.2 He succeeded to the title of King Æðelwulf of Wessex on 4 February 839.6 He was crowned King of Wessex in 839 at Kingston-upon-Thames, London, England.2 He abdicated as King of Wessex between 855 and 856.2
     Ethelwulf was the son of King Egbert and had previously ruled Kent and adjoining minor kingdoms. He continued wars against the Danes and had a victory at the mouth of the Parret in Somerset in 845 and again in 851 when he beat a force of 350 ships' companies who attacked Canterbury. Ethelwulf helped the Mercians against the Welsh and then married the Mercian king's daughter. He was a religious man and in 855 undertook a pilgrimage to Rome, leaving the country in charge of Ethelbald his eldest son. On his return, to avoid civil war, he allowed Ethelbald to retain Wessex while he ruled Kent and other parts of south eastern England.

Children of Æðelwulf, King of Wessex and Osburga (?)

Citations

  1. [S215] Unknown article title, Journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, Chobham, Surrey, U.K., volume 1, issue 6, page 409. Hereinafter cited as Foundation for Medieval Genealogy.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 5. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  3. [S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grenville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 6.
  5. [S58] E. B. Fryde, D. E. Greenway, S. Porter and I. Roy, editors, Handbook of British Chronology, 3rd edition (London, U.K.: Royal Historical Society, 1986), page 23. Hereinafter cited as Handbook of British Chronology.
  6. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 4.

Osburga (?)1

F, #102609, b. April 810, d. between 846 and 855
Last Edited=22 Jul 2012
     Osburga (?) was born in April 810. She was the daughter of Oslac of Hampshire. She married Æðelwulf, King of Wessex, son of Ecgbeorht, King of Wessex and Redburga (?), circa 830.1 She died between 846 and 855.1

Children of Osburga (?) and Æðelwulf, King of Wessex

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 5. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grenville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.
  3. [S58] E. B. Fryde, D. E. Greenway, S. Porter and I. Roy, editors, Handbook of British Chronology, 3rd edition (London, U.K.: Royal Historical Society, 1986), page 23. Hereinafter cited as Handbook of British Chronology.

Æthelstan, Sub-King in Kent, Essex, Sussex and Surrey1

M, #102610, b. circa 839, d. circa 850
Last Edited=3 Dec 2005
     Æthelstan, Sub-King in Kent, Essex, Sussex and Surrey was born circa 839. He was the son of Æðelwulf, King of Wessex and Osburga (?).1 He died circa 850.
     He held the office of Sub-king in Kent, Essex, Sussex and Surrey between 839 and 851.1 Although some sources cite Athelstan as Ethelwulf's eldest son, he has almost certainly been confused with Athelstan, son of Egbert, as the details of his life are identical. Therefore, it is improbable that Ethulwulf actually had a son called Athelstan.2

Citations

  1. [S58] E. B. Fryde, D. E. Greenway, S. Porter and I. Roy, editors, Handbook of British Chronology, 3rd edition (London, U.K.: Royal Historical Society, 1986), page 23. Hereinafter cited as Handbook of British Chronology.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 5. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.