Ruth Marie Gray1

F, #333641, b. 8 July 1955
Last Edited=1 Feb 2009
     Ruth Marie Gray was born on 8 July 1955 at Springfield, Clark County, Ohio, U.S.A.G.1 She is the daughter of Herbert Harry Gray and Mary O'Dell Smart.1 She and John Bryan were divorced.1 She married John Bryan.1 She married James Arthur Dixon, son of Jack E. Dixon and Bernadine E. (?), on 17 September 1976 at Springfield, Clark County, Ohio, U.S.A.G.1 She and James Arthur Dixon were divorced.1
     Her married name became Bryan.1 From 17 September 1976, her married name became Dixon.1

Children of Ruth Marie Gray and James Arthur Dixon

Citations

  1. [S3587] Unknown compiler, compiler, "re: Gray Family"; Ancestral File (30 January 2009), unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "re: Gray Family."

Simon Crosby1

M, #333642, b. 6 August 1637, d. 22 January 1724
Last Edited=26 Jan 2009
     Simon Crosby was born on 6 August 1637 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, U.S.A.G.1 He was the son of Simon Crosby and Ann Brigham.1 He married Rachel Brackett, daughter of Richard Brackett and Alice Blower, on 15 July 1659 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, U.S.A.G.1 He died on 22 January 1724 at age 86 at Billerica, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, U.S.A.G.1

Child of Simon Crosby and Rachel Brackett

Citations

  1. [S3587] Unknown compiler, compiler, "re: Gray Family"; Ancestral File (30 January 2009), unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "re: Gray Family."

Rachel Brackett1

F, #333643, b. 3 November 1639, d. 7 May 1748
Last Edited=26 Jan 2009
     Rachel Brackett was born on 3 November 1639 at Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.G.1 She was the daughter of Richard Brackett and Alice Blower.1 She married Simon Crosby, son of Simon Crosby and Ann Brigham, on 15 July 1659 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, U.S.A.G.1 She died on 7 May 1748 at age 108 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, U.S.A.G.1
     Her married name became Crosby.1

Child of Rachel Brackett and Simon Crosby

Citations

  1. [S3587] Unknown compiler, compiler, "re: Gray Family"; Ancestral File (30 January 2009), unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "re: Gray Family."

Eleanor Francis Hardesty1

F, #333644, b. 15 December 1921, d. 9 January 2003
Last Edited=1 Feb 2009
     Eleanor Francis Hardesty was born on 15 December 1921 at Conesville, Knox County, Ohio, U.S.A.G.1 She was the daughter of Harold L. Hardesty and Dora Charlotte Savage.1 She married Thomas Joseph Mattioni on 2 October 1943.1 She died on 9 January 2003 at age 81 at Coshocton County, Ohio, U.S.A.G.1
     From 2 October 1943, her married name became Mattioni.1

Child of Eleanor Francis Hardesty and Thomas Joseph Mattioni

Citations

  1. [S3587] Unknown compiler, compiler, "re: Gray Family"; Ancestral File (30 January 2009), unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "re: Gray Family."

Jonathan Danforth1

M, #333645, b. 29 February 1628, d. 7 September 1712
Last Edited=26 Jan 2009
     Jonathan Danforth was born on 29 February 1628 at Framlingham, Suffolk, EnglandG.1 He married Elizabeth Poulter on 22 November 1654 at Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.G.1 He died on 7 September 1712 at age 84 at Billerica, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, U.S.A.G.1 He was buried in September 1712 at The Old Cemetery, Billerica, Massachusetts, U.S.A.G.1
     (Research):1652 Freeman
District Land Surveyor, Town clerk for 20 years.
Founder of Billerica
'Its leading citizen of his generation and most noted surveyor of his time in the Colony'
DUNSTABLE:
The spring next after its incorporation, Dunstable was preambulated and the boundries of the town established and marked by Jonathan Danforth of Billerica, who had laid off the grant to the Boston Artillery Company the fall previous, the towns of Chelmsford and Groton some years before, and who is spoken of in Mr. Farmer's biographical notice of him as one of the most eminent surveyors of his time. In an elegy written in memory of Mr. Danforth, it is said of him:
'He rode the circuit; chained great farms and towns
To good behaviour; and by well marked stations
He fixed their bounds for many generations.'
CAPTAIN JONATHAN DANFORTH, 1628-1712, BILLERICA MASS.
Lieutenant of the Billerica Company, 1675. His dwelling was used as a garrison house in King Philip's war. Captain 1683. Served in the expedition against Canada under Sir. William Phips, 1690. Deputy to General Court, 1685.
JONATHAN DANFORTH, CAPTAIN (Nicholas1) was born February 29, 1628, at Framlingham, High Suffolk, England, and came to Cambridge with his father at the age of six. About 1654 he went to Billerica with the first settlers and built what was perhaps the first house erected in the Indian village of Shawshin, on the north side of what was to be West street. The house became the garrison home in 1676 for three families and six fighting men, including himself, his son Jonathan,17, and Samuel Manning. Watch was kept day and night during the period known as Philip's War. Danger of Indian attack was ever present and the settlers lived in fear. Jonathan and three others had the responsibility of fortifying the town, and the 48 families of the pioneer community were assigned quarters and hastening to designated posts when the alarm was sounded. Following King Philip's War in 1676, many Indian captives, especially children, were sold or divided among the colonists as servants until they became of age, and a boy of 12 was bound out to Jonathan Danforth. Known as John Warrick, he was styled 'the Indian servant of Captain Jonathan' when he died at Billerica, Jan. 15, 1686. Jonathan's land grant was in 1749 part of the estate of his grandson Samuel.
Known as 'Father of Billerica', Jonathan had extensive land holdings and showed an interest in every need of the town, serving as town clerk from 1665 until 1686, as deputy to the General Court 1684 and 1685, first captain of the town's militia in 1675, and chairman of the selectman in 1676 when he signed a petition asking for a reduction in taxes. He was one of three appointed in 1678 by the Governor's Council to suggest rules of safety for the outlying towns of Middlesex County. He was most famed as a land surveyor and for forty years he probably surveyed every land grant in Billerica, his land descriptions filling some 200 pages in his clear and handsome handwriting in the first volume of Land Grants. His services as surveyor were in demand all over Massachusetts and much of his work is preserved in the State Archives.
Jonathan was the 'life-long and trusted friend of the Rev. Samuel Whiting of Billerica, and though he joined the Chelmsford Church May 12, 1661, he continued his support of the faltering Billerica congregation and left two portfolios of church records and sermons by Mr. Whiting. To his great credit, he defied subpoenas of the Court, refusing to witness against accused witchcraft victims including Martha (Allen) Carrier who was hanged when she refused to confess guilt. He had the courage of a strong and independent nature, and historians refer to him as 'the wise and good Jonathan Danforth', Billerica's 'leading citizen of his generation', and 'the most noted surveyor of his time in the colony.' They write of his 'energy and wisdom', his 'eminent ability and unaffected piety'.
Excerpt from a poem supposedly by his nephew, the Rev. John Danforth of Dorchester:
'He rode the circuit, chain'd great towns and farm
To good behavior, and by well marked stations,
He fixed their bounds for many generations.
His art ne'er failed him, though the loadstone faile
When oft by mines and streams it was assailed.
All this is charming, but there's something higher
Gave him the lustre which we most admire.'
Jonathan Danforth married Elizabeth Poulter November 22, 1654, at Boston. She died October 7,1689, aet 56, in Billerica, and he married (2) Esther, daughter of Elder Richard Champney and widow of Josiah Converse, of Woburn November 17, 1690. 'Captain Jonathan Danforth, Gentleman' died September 7, 1712, aet 85, in Billerica, and his widow died soon after Jonathan and his two wives are buried in the old cemetery at Billerica. Only two sons survived their father but from them came a large posterity.
Jonathan Danforth lost his mother a week before he was a year old and was brought to New England by his father at the age of five or six(1634). His father died when Jonathan was only ten years old. He might have spent his early life in Cambridge and it may be that his eldest sister who was married in 1639 cared for the younger children. Jonathan's father left a large enough estate to support his children. Jonathan's brother Thomas inherited the family home in Cambridge but Jonathan settled upon outlying lands then called by their Indian names of Shawshine or Shawshinnock but later named Billerica. In October 1654, just a month before his marriage, Jonathan and a number of his neighbors had addressed a request to Cambridge that they might become a separate town and on 17 February 1654/5 the petitioners signed a statement that they accepted the report of the committee formed to consider their petition. As late as 1675 Jonathan Danforth was grantee certain land in and by Billerica because he had 'expended a thousand and a half of shingles to purchase Cambridge lands for the town. About 1654, Jonathan built his house on the north side of town and this might have been the first house built in Billerica. Being an original settler of Billerica and one of the earliest proprietors Jonathan received a proportionate share of each succeeding division of the town lands even as late as 1708 and frequent references are found to his extensive land holdings, numerous land transfers and items of taxation. He held many public offices: deputy for the town 1659-1660, town clerk, selectman and he also represented the town at the General Court in 1684/5. He also served as a surveyor and his descriptions of this service fill some 200 pages in the first volume of Land Grants. Many of his 'plots' are preserved in the State Archives and in various county records and some of them have been reproduced in publications.
Jonathan had various military responsibilities during the Indian Wars. Many indian captives, especially children, were sold or divided among the colonists as servants after the War in August 1676. One, a boy of twelve, 'son to Papa meck, Alius David, late of Warwick or Cowesit, Rhode Island, was apportioned or bound out to John Danforth. The boy became known as John Warrick and was so recorded when he died at Billerica on 15 January 1686.
Copy of a paper endorsed, 'A List of the Indian Children put to seruice that came in [to Boston] with John of Pakachooge; presented To the Honorable Gen.' Court for their Confyrmatio
August 10, 1676. A memorandum of Indian children put forth vnto seruice to the English. Beeing of those Indians that came in and submitted with John Sachem of Pakchoog; with the names of the persons with shome they were placed, and the names and age of the children, and the names of their relations, and the places they did belong to.
By mr. Daniel Gookin sen', Thomas Prentis, Capt., and mr Edward Oaks who were a comitee appointed by the Council to manage yt affayr. The termes and conditions vpon wch they are to serue is to be ordered by the Gen Coort who are to prouide yt the children bee religiously educated and taught to read the english toung.
1 Boy. To Leift. Jonathan Danforth of Bilerekey, a boy aged twelue yeares, son to Papameck alius Dauid, late of Warwick or Cowesit.
Capt. Jonathan Danforth signed his will in April 1709, the signature clear to read, though his hand trembled due to his age of 82. On 4 September 1711, he made out a list of his previous gifts to his children, that it might be used in connection with the desire apportionment expressed in his will. According to it, the previous gifts had varied from £12 to £30 to his five daughters, over £68 to son Samuel and the double portion of about £162 to his eldest son Jonathan. The will was probated on 27 October 1712 after his death on 7 September.
[Dawes-Gates Ancestral Lines compiled by Mary Walton Ferris]
'Founder of Billerica, MA., and it's leading citizen of his generation and the most noted surveyor of his time in the colony.' per Daniel Shed Genealogy, p. 53
Jonathan Danforth, the third son of Nicholas Danforth, was born in Framlingham, Suffolk, England on February 29, 1628, baptized March 2, 1628, came to Boston, Massachusetts with his father in 1634, grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts, moved to Billerica, Massachusetts when a young man, and assisted in the planning for and settlement of that town. There he built his home, which was still standing in 1878.
Jonathan was a land surveyor, specializing in the laying out of towns, farms, and highways. His survey descriptions fill 200 pages in the Billerica volume of land grants and many of his plots are preserved in the State Archives.
He became a select man, town clerk and representative. The records also list him as a lieutenant of the local company of militia in 1675 and as captain of the company in 1683. The Society of Colonial Wars in their publication (New York-1898) records that he served in King Phillips War under Major Daniel Gookin and that his dwelling was used as a 'garrison house.'
On September 9, 1654, Jonathan Danforth first married Elizabeth Poulter, the daughter of Good Poulter, who came to Billerica from Rayleigh, England about 1651. Elizabeth died October 7, 1689. Jonathan made his will on April 23, 1712, and it was proved October 27, 1712. His children were:
Mary (January 29, 1656),
Elizabeth (May 27, 1657),
Jonathan (February 18, 1659),
John (February 22, 1661 - June 4, 1661).
Lydia (June 1, 1664),
Samuel (February 5, 1665-6),
Anna (March 8, 1667-8),
Thomas (April 29, 1670-July 31, 1670),
Nicholas (July 1, 1671-March 8, 1694), and
Sarah (December 23, 1676).
New England Families Genealogy and Memorials, Vol. II-1913, records that after the death of his first wife, 'Captain Jonathan' married on November 17, 1690, Esther, daughter of Elder Richard Champney, and widow of Josiah Converse of Woburn, Massachusetts. She died on April 5, 1713.
Jonathan Danforth died September 7, 1712 and was buried in Billerica, Massachusetts. His tomb stone bears the likeness of a skull and the inscription reads: 'Captain Jonathan, Gentleman.1' He was also known as Jonathan Danforth.1

Child of Jonathan Danforth and Elizabeth Poulter

Citations

  1. [S3587] Unknown compiler, compiler, "re: Gray Family"; Ancestral File (30 January 2009), unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "re: Gray Family."


Elizabeth Poulter1

F, #333646, b. 1 September 1633, d. 7 October 1689
Last Edited=26 Jan 2009
     Elizabeth Poulter was born on 1 September 1633 at Rayleigh County, Essex, EnglandG.1 She married Jonathan Danforth on 22 November 1654 at Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.G.1 She died on 7 October 1689 at age 56 at Billerica, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, U.S.A.G.1
     Her married name became Danforth.1

Child of Elizabeth Poulter and Jonathan Danforth

Citations

  1. [S3587] Unknown compiler, compiler, "re: Gray Family"; Ancestral File (30 January 2009), unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "re: Gray Family."

Jack E. Dixon1

M, #333647, b. 2 January 1923, d. 15 August 1987
Last Edited=26 Jan 2009
     Jack E. Dixon was born on 2 January 1923 at Ohio, U.S.A.G.1 He married Bernadine E. (?).1 He died on 15 August 1987 at age 64 at Hertford, Perquimans, North Carolina, U.S.A.G.1

Child of Jack E. Dixon and Bernadine E. (?)

Citations

  1. [S3587] Unknown compiler, compiler, "re: Gray Family"; Ancestral File (30 January 2009), unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "re: Gray Family."

Bernadine E. (?)1

F, #333648, b. 18 May 1926, d. 4 July 1996
Last Edited=31 Jan 2009
     Bernadine E. (?) was born on 18 May 1926 at Ohio, U.S.A.G.1 She married Jack E. Dixon.1 She died on 4 July 1996 at age 70 at Barco, Currituck, North Carolina, U.S.A.G.1
     Her married name became Dixon.1

Child of Bernadine E. (?) and Jack E. Dixon

Citations

  1. [S3587] Unknown compiler, compiler, "re: Gray Family"; Ancestral File (30 January 2009), unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "re: Gray Family."

John Bryan1

M, #333649
Last Edited=1 Feb 2009
     John Bryan and Ruth Marie Gray were divorced.1 He married Ruth Marie Gray, daughter of Herbert Harry Gray and Mary O'Dell Smart.1

Citations

  1. [S3587] Unknown compiler, compiler, "re: Gray Family"; Ancestral File (30 January 2009), unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "re: Gray Family."

Amber Marie Randall1

F, #333650, b. 8 August 1982
Last Edited=26 Jan 2009
     Amber Marie Randall was born on 8 August 1982 at Rock Island, Illinois, U.S.A.G.1 She is the daughter of Steven Maxwell Randall and Penny Louise Hogan.1 She married Noah James Dixon, son of James Arthur Dixon and Ruth Marie Gray, on 6 August 1999 at Springfield, Clark County, Ohio, U.S.A.G.1
     Her married name became Dixon.1

Child of Amber Marie Randall and Noah James Dixon

Citations

  1. [S3587] Unknown compiler, compiler, "re: Gray Family"; Ancestral File (30 January 2009), unknown repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "re: Gray Family."