Theophilia Frampton1

F, #436651, b. 25 November 1781, d. circa June 1788
Last Edited=6 Jun 2010
Consanguinity Index=6.25%
     Theophilia Frampton was baptised on 25 November 1781 at Walton, Somerset, England.1 She was the daughter of Giles Frampton and Sarah White.1 She died circa June 1788.1 She was buried on 15 June 1788 at Holy Trinity, Walton, Somerset, England.1

Citations

  1. [S4658] NZ Genealogy Databases, online http://www.nzgbd.co.nz. Hereinafter cited as NZ Genealogy Databases.

Robert Frampton1

M, #436652, b. 18 October 1783
Last Edited=6 Jun 2010
Consanguinity Index=6.25%
     Robert Frampton was baptised on 18 October 1783 at Walton, Somerset, England.1 He was the son of Giles Frampton and Sarah White.1

Citations

  1. [S4658] NZ Genealogy Databases, online http://www.nzgbd.co.nz. Hereinafter cited as NZ Genealogy Databases.

Susannah Frampton1

F, #436653, b. 5 February 1786, d. 7 October 1872
Last Edited=6 Jun 2010
Consanguinity Index=6.25%
     Susannah Frampton was baptised on 5 February 1786 at Walton, Somerset, England.1 She was the daughter of Giles Frampton and Sarah White.1 She married John Lang in 1806 at London, England.1 She died on 7 October 1872 at age 86.1
      From 1806, her married name became Lang.1

Citations

  1. [S4658] NZ Genealogy Databases, online http://www.nzgbd.co.nz. Hereinafter cited as NZ Genealogy Databases.

John Lang1

M, #436654, b. 1784, d. 1872
Last Edited=6 Jun 2010
     John Lang was born in 1784.1 He married Susannah Frampton, daughter of Giles Frampton and Sarah White, in 1806 at London, England.1 He died in 1872 at Erin, Wellington City, Ontario, Canada.1

Citations

  1. [S4658] NZ Genealogy Databases, online http://www.nzgbd.co.nz. Hereinafter cited as NZ Genealogy Databases.

Nancy Frampton1

F, #436655, b. 1 June 1789
Last Edited=6 Jun 2010
Consanguinity Index=6.25%
     Nancy Frampton was baptised on 1 June 1789 at Walton, Somerset, England.1 She was the daughter of Giles Frampton and Sarah White.1

Citations

  1. [S4658] NZ Genealogy Databases, online http://www.nzgbd.co.nz. Hereinafter cited as NZ Genealogy Databases.


James Frampton1

M, #436656, b. 28 May 1792
Last Edited=6 Jun 2010
Consanguinity Index=6.25%
     James Frampton was baptised on 28 May 1792 at Walton, Somerset, England.1 He was the son of Giles Frampton and Sarah White.1

Citations

  1. [S4658] NZ Genealogy Databases, online http://www.nzgbd.co.nz. Hereinafter cited as NZ Genealogy Databases.

Theophilus Frampton1

M, #436657, b. 9 January 1794, d. circa April 1857
Last Edited=6 Jun 2010
Consanguinity Index=6.25%
     Theophilus Frampton was baptised on 9 January 1794 at Walton, Somerset, England.1 He was the son of Giles Frampton and Sarah White.1 He died circa April 1857.1 He was buried on 11 April 1857 at Walton, Somerset, England.1

Citations

  1. [S4658] NZ Genealogy Databases, online http://www.nzgbd.co.nz. Hereinafter cited as NZ Genealogy Databases.

Frederick Look Frampton1

M, #436658, b. 2 September 1822, d. 11 September 1880
Last Edited=4 Feb 2011
     Frederick Look Frampton was born on 2 September 1822 at Walton, Somerset, England.2,3,4,5 He was baptised on 2 September 1822 at Walton, Somerset, England.6,5 He was the son of Giles Frampton and Martha Look.1 He married Elizabeth Jane Thomas Hingston on 12 June 1850 at Wesleyan Chapel, Longford, Tasmania, Australia.1 He died on 11 September 1880 at age 58 at Ulverstone, Tasmania, Australia.7 He was buried at Ulverstone General Cemetery, Ulverstone, Tasmania, Australia, Sect 5, row H, # 5.8,5
     He emigrated arriving on 1841.3,5 Frederick and Sophia were working as servants at the home of Joseph White in Butleigh Wootton in 1841. (Robert Senior)
Frederick and Elizabeth originally farmed in the Longford district and the purchases 'Corn Hill' from the late Alexander CLERKE, of which 'Strathalbyn' forms a part after the estate was divided between the three children. ((Go...Be Fruitful and Multiply)
Went to Victoria in the 1850s with his brother-in-law to search for gold, but they were unsuccessful. (Chris Burgoyne)
The tombstone in Ulverstone cemetery reads 'F.L.Frampton who died Sept 6th 1880 aged 54 years also his wife E.J.Frampton died May 20th 1913 aged 87 years also their son R.N.Frampton died April 6th 1872 aged 17 years.' (Grave)

Advocate 05 Dec 1951. NEW AUSTRALIAN 109 YEARS AGO
Sailing from Southampton (Eng.) in 1842 one of the pioneers of the Ulverstone district wa Frederick Look Frampton, grandfather of Messrs P.C. and L.F. Frampton, Mrs M.A.Curnow and Miss M. Frampton, of Ulverstone.
He came under contract at 5/- per week from the time the boat sailed. The voyage to Van Dieman's Land took five months.
Frederick Frampton worked near Longford for 10 years then with James Hingston (brother-in-law) and John Cruse joined the goldrush at Sandhurst, afterwards named Bendigo. They were fairly succesful, and after four months decided to return to Tasmania, on the SS City of Melbourne.
In Bass Strait the ship was caught in a srorm and wrecked on King Island, on August 7, 1852. All the passengers and crew, 250 in all, reached the shore safely. The mate and two sailors volunteered to row a whaleboatto Stanley in an endeavour to procure a ship. It was six weeks before the shipwrecked people were back in Tasmania.
Mr Frampton then rented land at Buttley Hill near Cressy. In 1856 he came to the Leven, as Ulverstone was called and purchased 640 acres of bushland at five pound per acre from Alexnder Clarke. Later, when the Gawler - North Motton road was surveyed, he purchased a further 26 acres for a frontage on the road.
Ninety-six years ago there were only four houses at Ulverstone. They were in the vincinity of the wharf. Mr Frampton was a member of th first Road Trust on the north-west coast. He helped survey and clear some of the streets.
Two sons, the late James and Frederick Frampton took a contract to metal the first street from Ulverstone wharf to Pearl's Corner. The boy who drove the team which carted the necessary stone off the beach is still living. He is Mr. George Close, who lives near Lovett Street railway crossing. Mr Close was well known in the early days as a cricketer and horseman. He can tell many tales of the 'good old days' when he worked for 1/- per day and keep.
Mr Percy Frampton has in his possession a letter written over 100 years ago from England to his late grandfather and directed 'At Longford, Norfolk Plains, Van Dieman's Land'. He wears a heavy gold signet ring angraved with the initials, which, with other pieces of jewellery, his late grandfather had made from gold nuggets found in the Sandhurst gold rush.

The Advocate Weekender Saturday Februry 1, 1992
Family part of area's history
Local district histories on the North-West Coast are often family histories and that is certainly true of Gawler, the district just south of Ulverstone.
With Ulverstone's growth, Gawler has become almost a residential suburb. But it was primeval wilderness - an almost impenetrable wall of eucalypt and rainforest species - when one of its pioneer settlers, Frederick Looke Frampton, settled there about 1854.
It is believed he first leased tha land and bought it outright in 1861.
Part of the same land, Strathalbyn, is now being farmed by fifth and sixth generation descendants of Frederick Frampton, referred to by his descendants as 'the migrant'.
He had arrived in Tasmania as a 19 year old in 1842 and worked as a farm hand in the Longford and Cressy districts.
He was a 'bounty immigrant' sponsored by Launceston identity Henry Dowling who, with others involved in the anti-transportation movement, encouraged young free settlers to Tasmania. Frederick Frampton's fare was £5. The £5, like that of other passengers, was divided among the crew, depending on their rank. The captain was paid 30 shillings and the ship's carpenter, one shilling.
Frederick married another immigrant, Elizabeth Hingston, and they had seven children, three sons and four daughters.
By the mid-1850s Frederick Frampton had saved enough money to put a deposit on land of his own and he chose a 640-acre (one square mile) block at what is now Gawler.
Most of the land on both sided of the Leven were taken up under the Pre-Emptive Right Land Regulations of 1851, which were designed to encourage settlers to the North-West by making land available on a small deposit and annual payments.
However, the regulations failed to encourage many new settlers. Instead blocks of 640 acres were taken up by wealthy speculators in other parts of the island.
Alexander Clerke, of Longford, had several holdings in the Leven district, some acquired under the Pre-Emptive Right Regulations and some sold at auction in Launceston in 1852-53.
Frederick Frampton paid Clerke five pound an acre for his block but he did not immediately occupy it. Instead, showing good sense, he began a yearly programme of ring-barking and clearing his Gawler land while still earning a living elsewhere. With hired help he would ring-bark an area and return a year later to fall the dead trees and haul them with bullocks for a huge fire. At the same time he would ring-bark an adjoining area of forest to be cleared the following year.
When Frederick Frampton eventually moved to his land with his wife and family he called it Cornhill.
Travelling overland to the North-West in the mid-1800s was far from easy. There were only rough cart tracks through the forest to follow and no bridges.
The Framptons made the journey in a bullock dray carrying all they possessed. Crossing the Mersey River at the sandbar at low tide presented no great problem but the Forth River did.
There was no shallow sandbar at low tide so the Framptons unyoked their bullocks and swam them across. The wheels were taken of the dray which was then covered with a waterproof tarpaulin and floated across the Forth.
The family lived at first in a tent and then a small split paling hut. Frederrick Frampton later built a substantial two-storey residenceon his Cornhill property and planted English trees near the home. They are still standing.
The Framptons, father and sons, also had what was probably the first threshing machine on the North-West Coast in the late 1860s and early 70s.
This was a toime when cereal crops were grown extensively on the North-West Coast and the Framptons travelled from property to property with their threshing machine hauled by 12 bullocks - six of their own and six provided by the property owner who hired the threshing machine.
The original 640-acre property was later sub-divided into three farms, Cornhill, Strathalbyn and Belle Mont.
Frederick Frampton died at Gawler in 1880, aged 58. His widow died 27 years later, aged 87.
Robert, one of his three sons, was killed by a falling tree during clearing operations. His youngest son, Frederick Giles, continued to farm the Belle Mont property and also maintained the Frampton-Hingston family link when he married his cousin, Charlotte Hingston.
He built a substantial home on Belle Mont which was destroyed by fire on a Sunday evening while he and his wife were at church.
Neighbours attempted to extinguish the blaze without success but the quality of the early settlers of the district was demonstrated the next day. Thomas Shaw, a neighbour, went to Fred Frampton the day after the fire - with his cheque book.
The home was rebuilt on the original foundations and still stands today.
James married Hannah McDonald, sister of George McDonald, proprietor of the Sea View Hotel, now the River Arms. But James had a falling out with his brother-in-law who refused to allow him to use the road to the Leven jetty which was on his riverside land. James was underterred. He went home, yoked up a team of bullocks, returned with a gang of men and built the road that is now the main access to the wharf.
James and Hannah had no children.
Frederick Giles Frampton had two sone, Leslie and Percy. Leslie married Gladys White of Railton, who was teaching at the Gunns Plains school. Her father, P. H. White, despite having lost a leg in a threshing machine accident when he was 14, had a successful wheelwright and blacksmith business at Railton.
Leslie and Gladys Frampton continued farming Strathalbyn and had two sons, Fred and Trevor. Fred joined the Forestry Commission whilr Trevor, born in 1917, continued farming the family property from 1923 when his parents moved into Ulverstone till 1970.
In that year he became secretary of the Tasmanian Farmers' Federation, following the death of Jack Curtis, and his wife and son took after the property. Later, Trevor Frampton, well known in State and local government, managed a Victorian-based woodchip company, United Forest Products. However, it did not receive an export licence.
Trevor Frampton's main hobby in retirement is local history and recopying historic photographs of Ulverstone and its outlying districts.5

Children of Frederick Look Frampton and Elizabeth Jane Thomas Hingston

Citations

  1. [S4658] NZ Genealogy Databases, online http://www.nzgbd.co.nz. Hereinafter cited as NZ Genealogy Databases.
  2. [S474] FamilySearch, online http://www.familysearch.com. Hereinafter cited as FamilySearch.
  3. [S5127] e-mail address, Philip Trevett (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  4. [S5131] Www-civ.eng.cam.ac.uk/cjb/hingston/hd.htm, Chris Burgoyne (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  5. [S412] Brent Common, online unknown url, Brent Common (unknown location), downloaded 29 January 2011.
  6. [S5133] Unknown author, www.butleigh.org (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  7. [S5064] Brent Common, "re: Frampton Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger LUNDY (101053), 22 December 2010. Hereinafter cited as "re: Frampton Family."
  8. [S5129] Unknown author, Ulverstone Family History Museum (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).

Elizabeth Jane Thomas Hingston1

F, #436659, b. 1826, d. 19 May 1913
Last Edited=4 Feb 2011
     Elizabeth Jane Thomas Hingston was born in 1826 at Newton Ferrers, Cornwall, England.1 She was baptised on 12 May 1826 at Newton Ferrers, Devon, England.2,3,4,5 She married Frederick Look Frampton, son of Giles Frampton and Martha Look, on 12 June 1850 at Wesleyan Chapel, Longford, Tasmania, Australia.1 She died on 19 May 1913 at Ulverstone, Tasmania, Australia.6,5 She was buried at Ulverstone General Cemetery, Ulverstone, Tasmania, Australia, Sect 5, row H, # 5.5
     She immigrated in 1841.2,5 From 12 June 1850, her married name became Frampton.1

Children of Elizabeth Jane Thomas Hingston and Frederick Look Frampton

Citations

  1. [S4658] NZ Genealogy Databases, online http://www.nzgbd.co.nz. Hereinafter cited as NZ Genealogy Databases.
  2. [S5122] French and Badcock Family Book Committee, Go...Be fruitful and multiply (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date). Hereinafter cited as Go...Be fruitful and multiply.
  3. [S474] FamilySearch, online http://www.familysearch.com. Hereinafter cited as FamilySearch.
  4. [S5131] Www-civ.eng.cam.ac.uk/cjb/hingston/hd.htm, Chris Burgoyne (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  5. [S412] Brent Common, online unknown url, Brent Common (unknown location), downloaded 29 January 2011.
  6. [S5129] Unknown author, Ulverstone Family History Museum (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).

Izah Frampton1

F, #436660, b. 20 June 1802
Last Edited=6 Jun 2010
Consanguinity Index=6.25%
     Izah Frampton was baptised on 20 June 1802 at Walton, Somerset, England.1 She was the daughter of Giles Frampton and Sarah White.1

Citations

  1. [S4658] NZ Genealogy Databases, online http://www.nzgbd.co.nz. Hereinafter cited as NZ Genealogy Databases.