Nicolas Coningsby1,2

M, #407311, d. before 1635
Last Edited=23 Nov 2009
     Nicolas Coningsby was born at Morton Bagot.2 He was the son of Humphrey Coningsby and Elinora Copley.2 He died before 1635.2
      Could he have married Kateren Wylse on 5 April 1580 at Dymock, Gloucester (IGI).2 Reference: 92.2

Citations

  1. [S4142] Unknown author, Pedigree Recieved from Leominster part of the ' OG Wynn ' Papers - Part of the Jackson papers (RJCW Ref 43) (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  2. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.

Thomas Coningsby1

M, #407312
Last Edited=23 Nov 2009
     Thomas Coningsby is the son of Humphrey Coningsby and Elinora Copley.1
     Reference: 93.1

Citations

  1. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.

Humfrey Coningsby1

M, #407313
Last Edited=23 Nov 2009
     Humfrey Coningsby is the son of Humphrey Coningsby and Elinora Copley.1
     Reference: 94.1

Citations

  1. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.

William Coningsby1,2

M, #407314, b. before 26 October 1550
Last Edited=23 Nov 2009
     William Coningsby was born before 26 October 1550 at Alvechurch, Worcestershire, England.2 He was the son of Humphrey Coningsby and Elinora Copley.2
     Reference: 95.2

Citations

  1. [S463] Unknown subject, International Genealogical Index (IGI) (unknown repository address: unknown repository, 1969-), christening 26 oct 1550 Alvechurch, Worcestershire.
  2. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.

Edward Coningsby1

M, #407315
Last Edited=23 Nov 2009
     Edward Coningsby is the son of Humphrey Coningsby and Elinora Copley.1
     Reference: 96.1

Citations

  1. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.


Thomas Coningsby1,2

M, #407316
Last Edited=23 Nov 2009
     Thomas Coningsby was born at Morton Baghott.2 He is the son of Nicolas Coningsby and Margaret (?).2
     Reference: 97.2 Was this Captain Thomas Coningsby who died 18th June 1690, Burried at Felton in Hereford ?2

Child of Thomas Coningsby and unknown Sowley

Citations

  1. [S4142] Unknown author, Pedigree Recieved from Leominster part of the ' OG Wynn ' Papers - Part of the Jackson papers (RJCW Ref 43) (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  2. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.

Elenor Hackluyt1,2

F, #407317
Last Edited=10 Feb 2013
     Elenor Hackluyt was born at Eyton, Herefordshire, England.1,2

Children of Elenor Hackluyt and Thomas Coningsby

Citations

  1. [S4137] Unknown author, Pedigree in the The Visitation of Shropshire 1623 p 129 (RJCW -Coningsby Ref 3) (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  2. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.

Humphrey Coningsby1,2

M, #407318
Last Edited=23 Nov 2009
     Humphrey Coningsby was born at Docklow, Herefordshire, England.2 He is the son of Thomas Coningsby and Elenor Hackluyt.2
     Reference: 99.2 1st son and heir (Shropshire Visitation 1623).2

Citations

  1. [S4137] Unknown author, Pedigree in the The Visitation of Shropshire 1623 p 129 (RJCW -Coningsby Ref 3) (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  2. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.

Robert Coningsby1,2

M, #407319, b. between 1560 and 1570
Last Edited=10 Feb 2013
     Robert Coningsby was born between 1560 and 1570.2 He was the son of Thomas Coningsby and Elenor Hackluyt.2 He married Mary Wentworth in 1588.3,2

Citations

  1. [S4137] Unknown author, Pedigree in the The Visitation of Shropshire 1623 p 129 (RJCW -Coningsby Ref 3) (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  2. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.
  3. [S4187] Unknown author, Memoirs of Chesters of Chicheley (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).

Thomas Coningsby1,2

M, #407320, d. before 15 June 1616
Last Edited=23 Nov 2009
     Thomas Coningsby was born at Hampton Wafer, Herefordshire, England.2 He was the son of Thomas Coningsby and Elenor Hackluyt.2 He married Maria Sadler on 18 December 1587 at St. Stephens, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England.3,2 He died before 15 June 1616.4,2
      3rd Son

Hampton Wafer Branch

'CONINGSBY, Thomas II (d.1616) of Hampton Wafer, Herefordshire'

MP for Leominster1601, 1604, 1614

'3rd son of Thomas Coningsby 1 of Leominster by Eleanor da, or half sister of Thomas Hakluyt of Eyton, Leominster
m
(1)dau of one Sadler;
(2) Frances, dau of one Thomas Houghton of Houghton, Cheshire; at least 4 sons 1 daughter
Feodary, Herefordshire c 1599; jp by 1601; clerk of the petty bag 1608.

Coningsby, was like his kinsman and namesake of Hampton Court, a follower of the earl of Essex. His inquisition post mortem drawn up on the 15 June 1617 pronounced his 12 year old son Henry the heir to the manor he held at Grendon Warren and to his property at Leominster.'
Source:-
Members of Parliament'
.........................................................................................................................................................................

Exhibit 358
Letter of Absolution by the Archbishop of Canterbury to Thomas Coningsbye, Esq, Clerk of the Petty Bag' in the Chapel of the Rolls and Frances Lawton, alias Conyngsbye now his wife, Nathaniel Harris, priest and Private Chaplain to Sir Thomas Egorton, Keeper of the Great Seal, John Edgerton, Francis Leigh,Esq., William Ravensoroft,Esq., William Hawley, gent, Valentine Sawnders,Esq., John Littleton,Esq., Henry Jones,Esq., and Thomas Gwylliam gent., for a clandestine marriage which took place between the above Thomas Coningsby and Frances Lawton at the house of the above Henry Jones in St .Martin in the Fields (8 Feb.,1599/1600).
University of Wales
.........................................................................................................................................................................

The saga of the Burse Panel for the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1st circa 1596, discovered in 1998 and sold by Southerby's

The Property of a Deceased Estate

RARE AND IMPORTANT EMBROIDERED BURSE PANEL FOR THE REIGN OF HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH I,
English, circa 1596,
the deep crimson velvet ground worked in purl wire, gold and silver wrapped threads with raisedwork Elizabethan Royal cypher with rampant lion and Welsh dragon supporting the Royal coat of arms with quarterings of blue and scarlet satin, below a queenly crown the initials ER to either side of a Tudor rose with yellow floss silk centre latticed with metal strip and sequins, the ground densely spangled with silvered sequins and purl wire in various sizes, within narrow border of coiling leaf forms, styalised flowerheads, two outer sitle panels embroidered with wheatears, some small areas of purl wire have been restored, spangles to the floss silk centre of the tudor rose may have been reapplied. small area of damage to bottom right side border, 43 5cm. in gilt wood frame

The reverse of the frame is applied with a paper cataloge label numbered Lot 667, with a brief description stating that the piece originallv came from Plas Llangoed. Anglesey collection..exhibited at the Plymouth Armada Exhibition, 1888 and also by special request at the Exhibition of Armada and Eliziabethan relics at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane. October

The use of a special burse or purse to hold the Great Seal can be traced back as far as the end of the thirteenth century. The great Seal svmbolises the majesty of law just as the crown simbolises monarchy. During the 16th century, the seal would have been cast in silver and was extremely weighty. Initially the burse was in the form of a humble white leather or linen bag, but this changed in 1515 when Wolsey became Chancellor. It was said that in order to gratify his love of show it was transformed to a magnificent bag or Purse of crimson velvet, ornamented with the arms and emblems of England''. At this time it bnecame the custom for a new burse to be procured annualy. It is recorded that in 1801 a new burse cost seventy pounds. In 1872 the practice of supplying a burse once a year came in for criticism in the House of Commons, and it was decided that it should he renewed less frequently. Thereafter burses (costing £65 each) were expected to last for three years, When a new burse was provided, the old one became the property of the Keeper or Chancellor. It is not recorded when the burse ceased to actually hold the Great Seal, but there is a legend that an 18th century Chancellor once dropped the burse holding the enormously heavy Great Seal thus breaking a bone in his foot, Today the burse is normally empty but is used to hold the the Queen's Speech at the State Opening of Parliament,

OFFICERS OF STATE FOR THE REIGN OF QUEEN ELIZABETH I

1558, 18 Nov. The seal remained with the Queen
1558, 22 Dec .Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper
1579, 20 Feb. The seal remained with the Queen
1579, 26 Apr Sir Thomas Bromley, Chancellor
1587, 29 Apr. Sir Christopher Hatton Chancellor
1591 '22 Nov. The seal in commission
1592, 28 May (Sir John Puckering, Lord Keeper
1596, 6 May Sir Thomas Egerton , Lord Keeper. 1st Lord Ellesmere 1603, ( First
Viscount Brackley 1616).

The Great Seal of England was presented to Elizabeth on the second day of her reign. She kept it in her own possession rather more than a month before she decided upon her first Lord Keeper - Sir Nicholas Bacon, father of Francis Bacon. On 22nd December 1558 he was summoned to the Queens Royal Palace of Somerset house in the Strand between the hours of ten and eleven in the forenoon. The Queen taking the Grerat Seal from its white leather purse before the Lord Treasurer and many others delivered it to Sir Nicholas Bacon. with the title of Lord Keeper and .All the Powers belonging to a Lord Chancellor''.To begin with he used the Great Seal of Philip and Mary but on 26th Janury' 1559, it was broken by the
Queen 's command and replaced with one bearing her own name and insignia.( Lord Cambell, Lives of the lord Chancellors Vol II, 1845 and Close Rolls I Elizabeth )

On Bacon's death Sir Thomas Bromley was appointed Lord Chancellor but he died suddenly,
apparently of remorse after sentencing Mary, Queen of Scots to death on I 2th April 1589. Elizabeth sent John Fortescue Master of her Wardrobe to retrieve the Great Seal 'in the middle of the night in its velvet bag (Rot.CL.29)'' Next to be appointed was Sir Christopher Hatton — the 'Dancing' Chancellor 29th April. I 587. The Court was then situated at lie Archbishop of Canterbury's Palace at Croydon where she delivered the seal in its bag to her Vice Chamberlain and ordered him before the assembled company to seal a writ of Subpoena with it and then declared that he was to hold it as Lord Chancellor if England. he died on 21st November 1591 agcd 54 at his house in the city which has come to be known as Hatton Garden. The Queen did not take possession of the seal until the next morning. For seven months two comissioners performed duties of the Great Seal until 27th April 1592 when Sir John Puckering was appointed Lord Keeper. He died of apoplexy on 28th May 1592. Finally, Sir John Egerton (later Lord Ellesmere) was appointed Lord Keeper, until the accession of James I to the throne when he was made Lord Chancellor. He retired from office shortly before his death aged 77 in 1617.

It seems probable that the burse was purchased at auction c 1890 when it was known as Plas yn Llangoed (more commonly called Plas Llangoed) The origitial inhabitants of this sizeable estate situated in Anglesey. North Wales were the Jones familly. Although relatively wealthy they' do not seem to have been particularly influential or politically active in the region.. Henry Jones (christened Harri ap Lewis ap Ieuan, later anglicised his name to Henry Jones) lived there with his wife Elizabeth. their three sons and his daughter in the latter part of the 16 and early 17th century. In addition to his Welsh house he also owned a house in Saint Martins in the Field, London. In the Plas Coch manuscripts (held by the University Of Wales. Bangor) there exists a Letter of Absolution from the Archbishop of Canterbury for Henry Jones'involvement in arranging a clandestine marriage in his London residence between Thomas Coningsby and Frances Lawton dated 8 February 1599 / 1600 The priest who performed the ceremony' was Nathaniel Harris. Private chaplain to Sir Thomas Egerton the last Lord for the reign 1 Elizabeth I. It further appears that Henry Jones was part of Egerton's entourage as he was mentioned in a letter between land Lord Edgerton and Lord Essex dated Jan 15th 1598/9.2 Reference: 101.2

Child of Thomas Coningsby and Maria Sadler

Children of Thomas Coningsby and Francesca Houghton

Citations

  1. [S4137] Unknown author, Pedigree in the The Visitation of Shropshire 1623 p 129 (RJCW -Coningsby Ref 3) (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  2. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.
  3. [S4180] John Ewin Cussans, History of Hertfordshire (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date), 289 Vol 3. Hereinafter cited as History of Hertfordshire.
  4. [S4146] Unknown author, letter from Barry Watson 18/1/1999 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).