William Coningsby1,2

M, #407351, b. before 1497, d. 10 September 1540
Last Edited=2 Aug 2011
     William Coningsby was born before 1497 at Walington, Norfolk, EnglandG.1,2 He was the son of Sir Humphrey Coningsby and Alice Ferebie.2 He married Beatrix Thoresby in 1516 at Wallington cum Thorpland, Norfolk, EnglandG.2 He died on 10 September 1540.3,2 He was buried at St. Nicholas’ Church, Lynn, Norfolk, EnglandG.2
     He was educated at Eton College, Windsor, Berkshire, EnglandG. He held the office of Judge of the King’s Bench.2 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Kings Lynn in 1536. He was He was elected thence in 1497 to King’s College, Cambridge.
Like his father, Coningsby belonged to the Inner Temple ; he was treasurer of the Inn in 1525-6. In June, 1529, he was appointed a commissioner to assist Cardinal Wolsey in hearing causes in Chancery he was also prothonotary of the Common Pleas and Attorney of the Duchy of Lancaster.

Coningsby was in the Commission of the Peace for Norfolk from 1514 onwards, having previously served in the same capacity for Herts. His Norfolk residences were Eston Hall, Wallington, and a house in Woollen Street, Ly
(Hillen, 'History of King’s Lynn,' p. 733).

The manors of Wallington and Thorpland were conveyed to him in 1524-5
(Blomefleld, ‘‘Norfolk,' vol. vii, p. 411).

He owned other manors in Norfolk, including that of Wiltons in West Winch, probably received as a marriage portion
(Eller, Memorials of West Winch,' p. 126).

He was a benefactor of Dr. Andrew Borde, who in his will, made in the Fleet 11th April,
proved P.C.C. (29 Popplewell)

28th April, 1549, mentions two tenements at Lynn which he had by his gift
(see 'Sussex Archaeological Collections,' vol xiii, p. 269.

'Dictionary of National Biography,' sub 'Boorde ').
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On Michalmas Day, 1524, Coningsby was elected Recorder of Lynn, pursuant to the new Charter. On 31st May, 1536, he was elected one of the burgesses for the borough (Hist. MSS. Commission, Report xi, part iii, p. 175). In the same year he is named among the Norfolk gentlemen appointed by the King to 'abide in their countries and keep good order' in the absence of those who had gone to confront the pilgrimage of grace. On New Year’s Eve, 1539, he accompanied the Duke of Norfolk in the reception of Anne of Cleves at Rochester.

In the year 1540 we find recorded, in dramatically rapid sequence, the dismissal of Coningsby from office for advising a will upon a secret trust; his imprisonment in the Tower; his elevation to the King’s Bench; and his death.
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Hall’s ' Chronicle (1809 edition, p. 837) describes the proceedings against Coningsby in the Star Chamber, 31 Henry VIII Time xxiii daie of February, wer foure readers sent for to the Starre Chamnber, of euery house of the foure principall Innes of Courte one, where sat the lorde Chancellor, the lords Preuie seale, and xiiii of the chief of the kynges counsaill, and there the lorde chauncellor declared, how sir John Shelton, knight, had by the abuise of sir Huinfrey Broune, knight, the Kynges seriaunt, sir Nicholas Hare, knight, the Kynges counsailor, and Speaker of the Parliament, and William Coignesby, Esq., attorney of the Duchie of Lancastre, all beymmg his seruauntes and of his Fee, declared a fraudulent will of his landes, contrary to the statute made, anno xxvii, to the greats hynderauimce of the Kynges prerogative, and the true meanyng of the saied statute, and also to the euill example of all other, that should defraud the lordes of their seigniories. Wherefore the saied sir Humffrey Browne, and sir Nicholas Hare, wer that daie by the whole Counsaill of the Kynge, dismissed of their offices and seruice to the kyng, and sent to the tower; and three daies after was William Coignisby sent thether, where thei remaigned ten dayes, and after wher delivered but thei three lost all their offices, that thei had of the kyng.'
.........................................................................................................................................................................
Marillac writes in a despatch to Francis I, dated 3rd March, 1540

'A master of requests of this king and two most distinguished ministers of justice have been put in the Tower for having counselled a private affair to the prejudice of the king’s rights and revenues.'

Cromwell’s ' remembrances ' in 1540 contain the following entry

Surety taken for the learned men in the tower, every man with two sureties in 2,000 marks to abide the king’s pleasure (' Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic,' 1540, p. 130).

Wriothesley (' Chronicle,' vol. i, p. 116) says that 'the parties humbly submitting themselves to the king’s Majestie, and knowledging their offences, were pardoned.'

In Coningsby’s case the pardon meant complete restoration to favour, for after being called to the degree of the coif line was on 5th July raised to the King’s Bench. It seems clear ( 'Pace the Dictionary of National Biography ') that he was not knighted. He died on 10th September following.
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William and Beatrix Coningsby left one son and three daughters, Christopher’, found to be twenty-four in 1540, who married Ann, Daughter of Roger Woodhouse, and was slain at the battle of Pinkie in 1547; Margaret, married Robert Allington of Horseheath, Cambs., and afterwards Thomas Pledgeor of Bottisham ; Elizabeth, married Thomas Ferby of Paul’s Cray, Kent ; and Beatrix, married Thomas Water of Lynn.
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The following are abstracts of the wills of William and Beatrix Coningsby

Will of WILIAM CONYNGESBY, one of the Kings Justices at time plees before hym to be holden, dated 3 September 1540. I bequeath my body to be buried in the chapel of St. Nicholas. I give to the high altar of St. Margaret’s Church in Lynn, 40s. for my tithes and offerings negligently forgotten. My wife shall not bestow about my funeral and burying above the sum of £10 almns to be given to the poor people. I will have a priiest singing for me in St. Nicholas’ Church ten years after my decease. I give to the church of Walyngton 40s. I will that my wife shall pay to poor folk every Sunday for ten years 2s. I give to my wife Beatrix Conyngesbye, all my jewells, goods, and moveables whatsoever, other than by this will is given away, viz., a gold ring with a turkye, and another with a diamond, which I wear daily upon my hand, I give to my cousin Thomas Gibbon; and another ring of gold weighing about five nobles, which I give to my brother Thorysby; and rings of gold to my son Alyngton, my daughter Allyngton and my daughter Ferebye, at my wife’s discretion.

My wife shall divide my apparel among my servants. Each of my men servants shall have his year’s wages and livery, and each of my women servants shall have double her wages and livery. I give to William Walsingham my gown furred with white coney. I make my wife Beatrix my sole executrix, and Thomas Water supervisor to have for his labour £5.
Witnesses Thomas Guybon, Esquime, - Laurence Foreman and William Walsingham. Proved P.0.0. (13 Alenger) 11 October, 1540, by Malachi Coggeley, proctor for the executrix named.
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Taken From The List of Attorney Generals of The Duchy of Lancaster page 408:-

'1536 WILLIAM CONINGSBY 12 July d.p. (DL 42/22 f. 146 v), removed Feb 1540 (receiving a half year's fees to Easter, ibid., f. 160 & DL 28/7/9) on being charged with counselling Sir John Skelton to make a fraudulent will! Madox in his collections concerning the Star Chamber (B.M. Add.MS. 4521, f. 1), who couples him with Sir Humphrey Browne & Sir Nicholas Hare as being committed to the Tower 23 Feb 1540. He was released after ten days. Second son of SIR HUMPHREY CONINGSBY & a brother of JOHN CONINGSBY, receiver general. Of Eston Hall, Wallington (Norf), Eton & King's, Cambridge (Venn, Alumni Cantab, I. i. 379). Inner Temple, Lent. reader 1526 (chosen also in 1518 but did not read), treasurer 1526, prothonotary of common pleas, serjeant 1540 (Trinity) & justice of king's bench July 1540 (Dugdale, Origines Juiridicales, p.163, Foss, v. 145-6)'
(RJCW Ref 80)
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Coningby was also recorder of Lynn in Norfolk, in which county his seat, Eston Hall. near Wallington. was situate.
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CONINGBSY, WlLLIAM, the second son of the above-named Humphrey, wag educated at Eton, and King's college Cambridge, whither he went in 1497. He then became a member of the Inner Temple where he was reader in Lent 1526. And again in Lent 1520. In 1516 he was in the commission for gaol delivery at Kings Lynn, and was named in June 1529 a commissioner to assist Cardinal Wolsey in hearing causes in Chancery, He was recorder of Lynn, for which he sat in parliament in 1537, one of the prothonotaries of the Common Pleas, and attorney of the duchy of Lancaster, from the which he was removed on February 1540 on being charged with counselling Sir John Shelton to make a fraudulent will of his lands, and committed to the Tower. That this charge was without foundation may be presumed from his being released in ten days, and being selected within five months to be a judge of the King's Bench to which he was appointed on July 1540. It would seem that he sat little more than four months, and that Edward Mervin succeeded him on November 20th (Dugdale's Original163, 172 Rymer, xiv. 738).

He resided in the Woollen Market is Lynn, and at Eston Hall, Wallington, Norfolk. By his wife, a daughter of Thursby, of that county, he had an only son, Christopher, who was killed at Musselburgh in Scotland. Vth. (Ath Cantab. 76.)

Taken from Foss's Judges of England 1066 - 1870 published 1870.

Children of William Coningsby and Beatrix Thoresby

Citations

  1. [S4153] George Coningsby, a pedigree Coningsby of Hampton Court (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date). Hereinafter cited as a pedigree Coningsby of Hampton Court.
  2. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.
  3. [S4155] Unknown author, "The two Coningsbys", The Genealogist Volume XXVI (1910). Hereinafter cited as "The two Coningsbys."

John Coningsby1,2

M, #407352, b. before 1512, d. 14 June 1547
Last Edited=24 Nov 2009
     John Coningsby was born before 1512 at North Mimms, Hertfordshire, EnglandG.2 He was the son of Sir Humphrey Coningsby and Alice Ferebie.2 He died on 14 June 1547.3,2 He was buried at St. Dunstans in the WestG.2

Children of John Coningsby and Elizabeth Frowyke

Citations

  1. [S4153] George Coningsby, a pedigree Coningsby of Hampton Court (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date), a gravestone bore this date. Hereinafter cited as a pedigree Coningsby of Hampton Court.
  2. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.
  3. [S4156] Unknown author, Chauncey, i 47: Clutterbuck, i xxxii. (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).

Lucy Richards1

F, #407353
Last Edited=25 Nov 2009
     Lucy Richards married Pye Chavasse, son of William Chavasse and Sarah Stephens, in 1815.1
     From 1815, her married name became Chavasse.1

Citations

  1. [S47] BIFR1976 page 227. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S47]

Sophia Chavasse1

F, #407354, b. 14 February 1774, d. January 1849
Last Edited=25 Nov 2009
     Sophia Chavasse was born on 14 February 1774.1 She was the daughter of William Chavasse and Sarah Stephens.1 She married, firstly, Lt.-Col. Joseph Little on 12 August 1801.1 She married, secondly, Thomas Ingledew in 1829.1 She died in January 1849 at age 74, without issue.1
     From 12 August 1801, her married name became Little.1 From 1829, her married name became Ingledew.1

Citations

  1. [S47] BIFR1976 page 227. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S47]

Elizabeth Coningsby1,2

F, #407355, b. 1512, d. circa 1546
Last Edited=24 Nov 2009
     Elizabeth Coningsby was born in 1512 at Hampton Court, Herefordshire, EnglandG.2 She was the daughter of Thomas Coningsby and Cecilia Salwey.2 She married William Cavendish on 3 November 1542 at Blackfriers, Leicestershire, EnglandG.3,2 She died circa 1546.2
     Her married name became Cavendish.2

Child of Elizabeth Coningsby and William Paris

Children of Elizabeth Coningsby and William Cavendish

Citations

  1. [S4142] Unknown author, Pedigree Recieved from Leominster part of the ' OG Wynn ' Papers - Part of the Jackson papers (RJCW Ref 43) (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  2. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.
  3. [S4199] Unknown author, Letter from Barry Watson of Scaborough 28/1/99 RJCW Ref 43 (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).


Lt.-Col. Joseph Little1

M, #407356, d. 1826
Last Edited=25 Nov 2009
     Lt.-Col. Joseph Little married Sophia Chavasse, daughter of William Chavasse and Sarah Stephens, on 12 August 1801.1 He died in 1826.1

Citations

  1. [S47] BIFR1976 page 227. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S47]

Thomas Ingledew1

M, #407357, d. 31 October 1845
Last Edited=25 Nov 2009
     Thomas Ingledew married Sophia Chavasse, daughter of William Chavasse and Sarah Stephens, in 1829.1 He died on 31 October 1845.1

Citations

  1. [S47] BIFR1976 page 227. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S47]

Jane Hughes Chavasse1

F, #407358, d. 26 July 1825
Last Edited=25 Nov 2009
     Jane Hughes Chavasse was the daughter of Nicholas Chavasse.2 She married Charles Allen Chavasse, son of Henry Chavasse and Sarah Allen.1 She died on 26 July 1825.1

Citations

  1. [S47] BIFR1976 page 227, says 31 Feb 1780. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S47]
  2. [S47] BIFR1976. [S47]

Nicholas Chavasse1

M, #407359
Last Edited=25 Nov 2009

Child of Nicholas Chavasse

Citations

  1. [S47] BIFR1976 page 227. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S47]

John Coningsby1,2

M, #407360, b. after 1686
Last Edited=23 Nov 2009
     John Coningsby was born after 1686.2 He was the son of Thomas Coningsby and Chrysogen Emes.2
     Reference: 143.2

Citations

  1. [S4160] Unknown author, Will of Thomas Coningsby of Grendon Warran, C Hereford proved 14 July 1701 (RJCW Ref 7) (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).
  2. [S4132] Robin J Conisbee Wood, online <e-mail address>, Robin J Conisbee Wood (unknown location), downloaded 23 November 2009.