Rachael Elizabeth Green1

F, #464551, b. 18 February 1972
Last Edited=27 Jul 2011
     Rachael Elizabeth Green was born on 18 February 1972 at Northwestern General Hospital, Burnie, Tasmania, Australia.1 She is the daughter of Philip Martin Green and Joan Elizabeth Frampton.1 She married David Stuart Coombe on 28 December 1996 at St. Mark's Church, Pontville, Tasmania, Australia, in a The Church of England service was conducted by Fr Booth. marriage.1
      From 28 December 1996, her married name became Coombe.1 She was a School Teacher.1

Children of Rachael Elizabeth Green and David Stuart Coombe

Citations

  1. [S412] Brent Common, online unknown url, Brent Common (unknown location), downloaded 29 January 2011.

Jamie Robert Kemp1

M, #464552, b. 1 April 1971
Last Edited=27 Jul 2011
     Jamie Robert Kemp was born on 1 April 1971 at Harden Hospital, Harden, New South Wales, Australia.1 He was baptised as a Roman Catholic rites by Fr Vincent Butler on 17 July 1971 at St. Patricks Church, Binalong, New South Wales, Australia.1 He married Jackelyn Yvette Green, daughter of Philip Martin Green and Joan Elizabeth Frampton, on 17 January 1998 at Sacred Heart Church, Ulverstone, Tasmania, Australia, in a Roman Catholic service. marriage.1
      Upon completion of the Higher School Certificate, he applied for a position in the 1989 Diploma of Education intake at Charles Sturt University, Wagga campus. He also successfully applied for a scholarship to attend the university and completed his studies in 1991. His first appointment as a Primary school teacher was to Hanwood Public School, a small township on the outskirts of Griffith, NSW. He taught there for five years before meeting Jackelyn whilst on holidays in 1996. Jackelyn and Jamie moved interstate to Jackelyn's home state of Tasmania in 1997 where he commenced employment at Stella Maris Primary Catholic School in Burnie on the state's Northwest Coast. He taught there for 6 years and began his first Executive role when he was promoted to the position of Deputy Principal 3 years into his tenure. During this time Jamie and Jackelyn married and had two children, Alexander and Samuel. They lived in the township of Ulverstone and renovated a small house in Victoria Street before selling it and moving to a larger house in Lockett Street. Whilst the birth of Alex was normal and his development healthy, Samuel's birth brought many challenging times as he was born with Velo-Cardial-Facial Syndrome. The two major complications for Samuel were Fallots' Tetralogy (a heart condition which required two lots of heart surgery, one of which was open heart) and an ongoing immune deficiency. As of the time of this article being written, Samuel was enjoying a normal lifestyle with future heart surgery expected at around age 15. Samuel has also experienced a number of developmental delays although regular specialist assistance has addressed these problems. Jackleyn and Jamie moved to Canberra in 2003 where Jamie commenced employment at St. Anthony's Parish Primary School. He taught for a year as a classroom teacher before acting in a number of Executive positions in 2004 and 2005. He was employed as a Primary Coordinator permanently in 2005. Jamie always had a love of sports and played a wide variety of sports before and during his married years. His upbringing in country NSW meant that his leisure time was spent at various sporting arenas and this is reflected in the diversity of his sports participation. By the age of 36 he had played and won A Grade club championships in: cricket (Wagga), touch football (Burnie), golf (Griffith), tennis (Harden, Canberra) and badminton (Griffith, Ulverstone). He also played A Grade squash, indoor cricket and Australian Rules Football and represented his town and district in athletics, swimming, tennis and golf. Of all these sports golf was the most enjoyed.
(Jamie Kemp -2007).1 He was a Primary School Teacher.1

Children of Jamie Robert Kemp and Jackelyn Yvette Green

Citations

  1. [S412] Brent Common, online unknown url, Brent Common (unknown location), downloaded 29 January 2011.

Alexander Jamie Kemp1

M, #464553, b. 24 January 2000
Last Edited=27 Jul 2011
     Alexander Jamie Kemp was born on 24 January 2000 at North West Private Hospital, Burnie, Tasmania, Australia.1 He is the son of Jamie Robert Kemp and Jackelyn Yvette Green.1 He was baptised on 23 September 2000 at St. Anthony's Church, Harden, New South Wales, Australia.1

Citations

  1. [S412] Brent Common, online unknown url, Brent Common (unknown location), downloaded 29 January 2011.

Samuel William Kemp1

M, #464554, b. 24 October 2001
Last Edited=27 Jul 2011
     Samuel William Kemp was born on 24 October 2001 at North West Private Hospital, Burnie, Tasmania, Australia.1 He was baptised at St. Anthony's Church, Harden, New South Wales, Australia.1 He is the son of Jamie Robert Kemp and Jackelyn Yvette Green.1
      Sam was born with Vello-Cardio-Facial Syndrome and spent the first year of his life fighting to stay alive. He was such a fighter that Brent Common nicknamed him the Hornet, after Australia's FA18 fighters. Sam overcame two early cardiac operations and by 2007 had very nearly caught up with his peers.1

Citations

  1. [S412] Brent Common, online unknown url, Brent Common (unknown location), downloaded 29 January 2011.

David Stuart Coombe1

M, #464555, b. 11 May 1967
Last Edited=27 Jul 2011
     David Stuart Coombe was born on 11 May 1967 at Calvary Hospital, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.1 He was baptised at Swan Street, Uniting Church, North Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.1 He married Rachael Elizabeth Green, daughter of Philip Martin Green and Joan Elizabeth Frampton, on 28 December 1996 at St. Mark's Church, Pontville, Tasmania, Australia, in a The Church of England service was conducted by Fr Booth. marriage.1
     He was a School Teacher.1

Children of David Stuart Coombe and Rachael Elizabeth Green

Citations

  1. [S412] Brent Common, online unknown url, Brent Common (unknown location), downloaded 29 January 2011.


Hannah Elizabeth Coombe1

F, #464556, b. 1 August 1998
Last Edited=27 Jul 2011
     Hannah Elizabeth Coombe was born on 1 August 1998 at Calvary Hospital, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.1 She was baptised as a Church of England rites. at St Marks, Church, Pontville, Tasmania, Australia.1 She is the daughter of David Stuart Coombe and Rachael Elizabeth Green.1

Citations

  1. [S412] Brent Common, online unknown url, Brent Common (unknown location), downloaded 29 January 2011.

Adam David Coombe1

M, #464557, b. 6 February 2001
Last Edited=27 Jul 2011
     Adam David Coombe was born on 6 February 2001 at Calvary Hospital, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.1 He is the son of David Stuart Coombe and Rachael Elizabeth Green.1 He was baptised as a Church of England rites. on 16 March 2002 at St. Mark's Church, Bellerive, Tasmania, Australia.1

Citations

  1. [S412] Brent Common, online unknown url, Brent Common (unknown location), downloaded 29 January 2011.

Trevor Thornton Frampton1

M, #464558, b. 2 January 1917, d. 28 June 1999
Last Edited=27 Jul 2011
     Trevor Thornton Frampton was born on 2 January 1917 at 'Strathalbyn', Gawler, Tasmania, Australia.1 He was the son of Leslie Fredrick Frampton and Hilda Gladys Ivy White.1 He was baptised on 27 May 1917 at Gawler Methodist Church, Gawler, Tasmania, Australia.1 He married Marjorie Joan Campbell on 20 January 1943 at Holy Trinity Church, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, in a Church of England rites. marriage.1 He died on 28 June 1999 at age 82 at Burnie Hospital, Burnie, Tasmania, Australia.1 He was buried on 30 June 1999 at Ulverstone General Cemetery, Ulverstone, Tasmania, Australia, Sect 6, row I, # 5.2,1
     He was Farmer.1 He gained the rank of Lieutenant in the service of the Army Service Corps.1 He fought in the Second World War.1

Children of Trevor Thornton Frampton and Marjorie Joan Campbell

Citations

  1. [S412] Brent Common, online unknown url, Brent Common (unknown location), downloaded 29 January 2011.
  2. [S5129] Unknown author, Ulverstone Family History Museum (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date).

Marjorie Joan Campbell1

F, #464559, b. 27 November 1917
Last Edited=27 Jul 2011
     Marjorie Joan Campbell was born on 27 November 1917 at Low Head, Tasmania, Australia.1 She was baptised as a Church of England rites. at Holy Trinity Church, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.1 She married Trevor Thornton Frampton, son of Leslie Fredrick Frampton and Hilda Gladys Ivy White, on 20 January 1943 at Holy Trinity Church, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, in a Church of England rites. marriage.1
      Marjorie was born at Low Head when her father was the lighthouse keeper there. She later lived in Goose Island lighthouse from 1921 to 1925. She went to boarding school when her parents moved to Cape Sorell lighthouse. She was at Collegiate School for two years then went to Clenes College, now Friends, at age 11 and 12. Her parents retired in 1930 when Marj was 13 years old and her father died soon after. She started work at Brownell's store in Hobart aged 14. Brownell's was situated where Hobart Myers now stands and was a similar type of store. She stayed there for seven years and then worked for five years with Charles Davis, ironmonger, until leaving to get married. (Marjorie Frampton)

MY LIFE
Marjorie Joan Frampton nee Campbell
I was born on the 27th November 1917 at Beaconsfield, Tasmania the youngest of the five children. My sisters Phyllis 22 years older, and Rita 20 years older, brothers Rupert 12 years older and Norman 10 years older, so we were well spaced out. At the time my parents were at Low Head Lighthouse. I was only between four and five when my father transferred to be the head keeper at Goose Island so I haven't many memories of Low Head. I can remember when my mother used to sing me to sleep because I was frightened of the rats in the wall and I also remember that she was using the mangle to press the sheets and I had been sent out of the room but unbeknown to her I was back, and the next thing was I had my fingers in the mangle. I lost the end of my little finger and had the next finger stitched. My poor parents were frantic as there was no doctor. I believe a nurse came and they took me to Launceston in a motor launch - the only other way was by horse and trap. I had my arm in a sling foe six weeks and kept saying, “It's a long time to be better”.
Another accident was my mother falling in the water. Dad and I went to meet her when she was coming back from a day in Launceston. When she went to step from the motor launch onto the wharf she slipped and fell in and was lucky to have been saved - I know I didn't like sitting next to her in the horse and trap because she was very wet.
Another time - my father was very angry as he found two of his three cows dead and he thought someone had poisoned them, but now I think it was bloat.
Every Saturday night was a bath and a dose of castor oil for your bowels. We had to bath in wooden tubs and light the copper to get hot water.
Now it's time to move to Goose Island which consisted of three homes, one family and one man lived alone. We left on the Lady Loch, one of Holyman's boats. The trip was very rough and my mother was ill all the way. I stayed up with the Captain as Dad was helping. My sister Phyllis was with us, and I believe she was nearly washed overboard and just saved by a coil of rope. The Captain said we were very lucky to make it. On arrival we were put ashore in the lifeboat, plus furniture. The island was covered in pigface, no trees, lots of penguins, and mutton-birds, and lovely beaches. The open sea was at the bottom of the garden and you could walk around the island. I believe it was called Goose Island because it was a nesting place for Cape Barren Geese.
The island is about 50 feet above sea level at its highest point, half a mile wide, about one and a half miles long, and covered with mutton-bird holes. I believe the houses and light were built by convicts and the tower is supposed to be haunted.
While on this Island my Mother took sick. Anything that could be burnt was - to try to get help, and my father also used Morse code. Eventually help came from Whitemark and Mother was taken away in a launch to Launceston. The doctor said “another six hours and she would have died”.
I remember Mum used to salt the mutton birds down, and Dad used to smoke a lot of fish. He did this in one of the rooms in the house. At one stage my Father had some sheep arrive but they were mostly blind and many of them were drowned.
My mother taught me to knit with meat skewers and string. I remember when she was in bed ill I would have to take a dish in the bedroom and wash myself so she could watch me, as Mum was haemorrhaging, Dad would put me on a box to try and do a bit of washing and then back on the box to peg the clothes out. Dad would put food on to cook and I would have to tell Mum what it looked like. Of course there wasn't a bath and only wooden tubs. It was a big old stone house built by convicts.
One day I remember Dad and I saw a small plane fly over and he told me it was Father Christmas but a short while ago we worked out that it would have been Bert Hinkler when he flew solo - I think around the world.
We would only get our provisions and mail every three months if we were lucky and then I would go out with my Father in the lifeboat to Colliboi . At night we would hear the penguins on the wood heap talking like old men. When the mutton-birds were coming you would see a black mark across the water and you would hear them fighting for their own nests. I have eaten mutton-bird eggs - very big and rich. Our only form of entertainment was playing the gramophone, and books used to be sent when the stores arrived.
I can remember my brother Norman helping to push my doll's pram. He was ten years older than me but played with me and I loved him.
From now on I am a bit hazy about things but I think I was taken to Launceston and my Mother bought a house in Invermay and my two brothers lived with us. Before this we did board for short time. My brother Rupert was doing his apprenticeship with Hinman and Wright Builders and my brother Norman was working at Henty's Warehouse. Both boys were put off during the Depression. Norman joined the navy and Rupert went to N.S.W. trying for work. I used to go to school and one day I was sent home as it was thought our house was on fire but it was a timber yard behind us and I remember wet blankets being put on the fences. Another time my Mother found me taking pennies and was worried about me. She came in to the school to find that one of the girls had told me that if I didn't give her some pennies her father was a policeman and he would come and get me.
I don't really remember much more about Launceston. I think now that Dad was then transferred to Cape Sorell. My sister Phyll had come to Goose Island to help Dad to pack and I was sad because she gave all my books and boy china doll and a celluloid doll away.
Dad was on leave in Hobart where Mum and I must have joined him. I was sent to boarding school. I must have just turned nine. Collegiate School didn't have a vacancy at that moment so I was sent to an old couple in Fitzroy Place by the name of Todd. They had one daughter Kathleen, eight years older than me, and she was a great friend - even to be Matron of Honour at our wedding. Mr Todd taught me how to play crib and I hated it but had to have a game with him every night before bed. If I was good I was allowed to go into the sitting room and play a musical box.
One night the house was broken into and the maid threw a bucket of water over a man in the drive from an upstairs room. One thing I hated was being made to sleep in a big old iron cot. I think I cried every night - it was awful. The night Mum had to leave me we both cried. Rita used to have me up there sometimes for a weekend, and would give me birthday parties.
I think it was nearly a year before I went into Collegiate School and I hated it. The sisters were very strict and the meals just. Prayers, and a walk every morning, and to the cathedral every Sunday morning. Norman was home on leave at one stage and he would take me out and send me back with lollies. We used to get one shilling a week for train fares and extras and if we spent it we would just have to walk. I remember one night the other four girls and I had a sheet on the floor having a midnight feast when the Sister walked in and caught us so we had to do one hundred lines for that. Another day I was tied to a tree at lunch time. One time the school was broken into, the desks upturned, and inkwells smashed. We were all very frightened and kept indoors.
Mrs. Todd had a cottage at Brown River so sometimes she and Kath would take me for the weekend. One holiday I had nowhere to go and I was to be at school on my own when I was saved by Mr. McPhee. He was a member of parliament and I think sent one of his daughters back to take me home. They had a lovely home up Davey Street so I had a lovely holiday with them.
Every Christmas I would go to Cape Sorell for my holidays. Rita and her children used to come as well. We would leave Hobart in the train at 9am, reach Burnie about 6pm, spend the night there, then catch the train to Strahan. If the weather was fit we would be taken on a motor launch to the Heads where my father would meet us with a wooden truck on wooden rails drawn by a horse, then go about a mile I think, then the horse would be put in a trap, and then we would go about another mile along the beach. There were many masts and spas along the breakwater which were the washed up remains of wrecks. You couldn't swim there as it was quicksand. Our next step was to put the horse into the harness of another wooden truck, and then go for quite a distance, then there - the lighthouse and station at last, home! Going home one trip was so rough they didn't think we would make it. Macquarie Harbour can be very rough. I used to always be very happy when we couldn't get back to school on time.
I then went to live with Mrs. Tragear and her family, and went to Clemes College. Mr Tregear was an estate agent. One holiday I took their daughter Marie home with me to Cape Sorell. I learnt music, but of course I didn't practice it. Mrs. Tregear used to go to play croquet every day so Marie and I would tell her we had practised - now I regret not having practised. On Sundays we were made to walk a good mile to Church in the morning and Young Worshippers League, and then Sunday after lunch. At teatime it would be another long walk out to Moonah to the Tregear's parent's home. They had a pig farm and one day we were chased by a pig and had to stay up a tree until help came. I can remember them having large dishes of milk with beautiful scalded cream on it. The Church put on a play called “Dick Whittington”, and I was the cat. We also had fairs and I used to go in the Pedlars Parade and one year I had violets to sell. Mr. Wignall, who was the mayor, used to pick them and make them into bundles for us.
My sister Phyllis was living in Hobart. She used to work for Mrs. Tregear before I went there, so she would come and take me shopping sometimes and to the dentist, but mostly I took myself to a dentist on the way home from school. We children were left at home on our own every night and David would get croup and that would frighten Marie and I. I was very worried and frightened because Marie told me that when I was thirteen I would be told the secret of the family and I would wear naps again, so imagine what my thoughts were.
We girls at school would buy “conversation lollies” and give them to the boys. I played some tennis and some basketball. I would go home for lunch and Mr. Palfreyman, the owner of Palfreyman's shops, used to pick me up on the way back to school. He had a large family - nine of them - and was a great worker for Clemes College. One speech night he was there with his family giving out prizes when he received word that the shop was on fire. He lost everything, so it was a sad night.
One Christmas when I was at home at Cape Sorell my Mother had to take a bee sting out of the throat of one of the assistants. Dad had a number of fowls and one morning I went with him to feed them and they were all dead. Dad found a native cat lying between the bags and wire. There were a lot of snakes and goannas on the Station. My Father loved fishing and often he would choose to put flounder and crayfish back in the sea. I remember crayfish and new bread for supper.
Dad always painted the top of the tower rather than make the men do it, but Mum always drew the blinds in case he fell. I used to love to run up and down the stairs and hide in the window sills. I remember having a lovely dolls house and I sold it to some tourists one day.
After Dad and Mum had been at Cape Sorell - Dad retired. Their first house was a place they rented in Darcy Street, South Hobart. I was taken from Clemes and went to Macquarie Street State School. I found it quite hard and so different from college. I played a little hockey. Later we bought a home in Lansdowne Crescent, West Hobart, and Dad made a beautiful garden and had everything just perfect - he was so fussy. While living there I got myself a position at Brownells for the Christmas holidays serving in the showroom, and after Christmas I received a letter asking me if I would like a position in the office, so I was very lucky. My only disappointment was that I had always wanted to be a nurse.
When I brought my first boy home I had to bring him to the front door to meet my Mother. Dad didn't know anything about it. While we were living there my brother Norman brought his new bride home. Her name was Marjorie and she was a beautiful looking girl, but sad to say they were later divorced.
One day I went to answer a knock on the door and there was a very scruffy looking man and he came straight in and I was frightened, but it turned out to be my brother Rupert. We hadn't heard of him for a long time. He had been working in N.S.W. but had lost everything. Of course Dad took him in but it was very hard for them as they had to go without to help him. Then one day he told them he had a girlfriend and a baby boy, so of course Dad told him he would have to bring them home, so this made it even harder for poor Mum and Dad. Dad loved the little boy, Douglas. He always took him each morning to get the paper.
Dad wasn't very well and was put in hospital for an operation. It was found he had cancer and was given three months to live and he did, right to the day. My Mother nursed him and did a wonderful job. I went in to see him every day on my way home from work and he would always say, “Another day gone Marj” He was very brave and suffered dreadfully.
While I worked at Brownells I did some modelling a couple of times a year and in front of Lady Clarke and once with the Clem Dawe Show at the Theatre Royal. When I was working at Brownells I was actually chosen by Janson Bathers people, they had a fashion parade of just bathers and chose different ones from the shop. Brownells were very good to me. They would often tell me to stay home with my mother. After seven years I left Brownells and went to Charles Davis to a better position and stayed with them for five years.
Mum was very lonely so Rupert built a house next door to Rita's in Wellesley Street but it was far too hilly for her so later we moved to a house in View Street, Dynnyrne where I lived with her until I was married at 25 years of age. While living there i can remember the cart and horse coming around calling out “Rabbeo and fresh rabbits”. I also recall the baker and milkman calling. My brother Norman had been at war and later came home and worked at Wrest Point. He married again a couple of years before me. He then went to Sydney to live.
A few things I can remember that happened while we were living in Wellesley Street, next to Rita's. On the hill above us there stands a notice made in stones and painted white which says “Keens Curry”, but I remember the University students changing it to “Hells Gates”. They also covered the Post Office clock in black. I used to work back on night a week getting accounts out and would come home at about 1 o'clock - twice I was followed - once the man was on the same tram and he got off with me and walked beside me calling me “Dear' and “Sweetheart”. Of course I was petrified and don't know whether I ran or not as my legs were numb. He came right to the gate but thank goodness that was all. Another night he drove and kept pace with the tram but I got off the tram and saw a lady and asked if I could walk with her. She said he did this to others .Actually his name was Large and he drove a black service car to Launceston. I told my brother Rupert about it, he said he knew him and would make sure it stopped, which it did. Also it was a sad time as Rita's only daughter was taken to hospital one afternoon and we got a message to say Rita and Claude were wanted but they had left so I took Fred with me and went to the nearest phone and rang. Claude came and told me she had died, poor Fred screamed all the way home. It was a terrible shock, she was only twelve and Fred thirteen. Another time was when we had the terrible fires and it was called “black Friday”. The shops closed early, it was so dark and when I got off the tram I could barely see my way home and Claude was there to meet me. There were many homes destroyed and quite a number of people lost their lives. It was very frightening. Some of the homes were in Dynnyrne and Princess Street, also the Fern tree was burnt, it was all around us.
It was quite funny how I met Trevor. I had been sick and was having a holiday in Launceston with girl friend from work. She had a brother in camp with Trevor and as he wanted a loan of Trevor's motor bike he had to get Trevor a girl and I was the mug. I was staying with a Mrs. Henry and when Trevor called she introduced us and left. He said “will you come to the pictures?” and I said “yes”. But “no”, to the suggestion that we went on the bike. I made him walk instead. I was to go to the pictures the following week but on the Sunday morning Trevor and a friend left for Ulverstone on the bike and had an accident. Trevor was unconscious for four days. While he was unconscious he told his mother where to get in touch with me to let me know what had happened. Well we did see each other again in Launceston later on but I wasn't a bit interested. Much later my friend Kath told me she knew someone who would marry me tomorrow. It was Trevor and he was in camp with her husband. I just laughed and said, “I wouldn't marry him if he asked me”. Well I guess I suddenly woke up after he rang me one day. We actually got engaged in Cambridge. I went over hoping to stay at the hotel but they wouldn't even give us a cup of tea. Trevor was in camp there so we were walking up the road when a Mr. Murdoch asked us in and when his wife came home she said, “You are staying here”. Quite a joke. Trevor went back to tea but forgot to eat it. The Murdochs thought it a great joke but soon found him some. They were lovely people and I stayed quite a lot while Trevor was camping there. Their son and his wife still keep in touch. She is a sister of Mrs. Denny Hughes in Ulverstone.
I was married at Holy Trinity and just had some of the family home afterwards. Rita saved up enough food coupons to make me a wedding cake. Trevor's parents were staying with us. I couldn't be dressed as a bride, much to my disappointment, because you had to have coupons to buy clothing and there weren't enough. I had some of my evening frocks made into dresses to help. It was very hard to get cakes as cream, butter, tea and sugar, and many other items were rationed. Petrol was also rationed so we had to travel by train on our honeymoon. We spent our first night in Hobart at the Freemasons Hotel. We had to use Fred's car to get to the Freemasons and when he came to pick it up Trevor called out the window, “have you got everything under control?” to which Fred called back, “Have you got everything under control. Ha Ha?” The next day we went by bus to Lake St. Claire. We had a small room on its own and went along to a dining room made with trees and ferns. Our next stay was in Burnie at the Club Hotel for one night, and then to Ulverstone and on to Gawler which was Trevor's home. We spent a few days there and then back to Hobart by train. While at Gawler we were given a 'tin kettling' as it was called. All the neighbours came as a surprise and met outside banging tins and cans. After our honeymoon Trevor went back to camp and I went to my home and work at Charles Davis.
After a few months Trevor was sent to Drysdale near Geelong, so he sent for me to go over. I was staying at a lovely hotel at Drysdale near the water. There was only one other lady and that was Mrs. Philpott from Devonport. They owned Frank's material shop in Devonport. Trevor used to come in from camp every night to sleep. He didn't think his commander knew but one night we were in bed and heard a truck pull up, and banging on our door. He was ordered back to camp. The commander said he wasn't sorry for Trevor but for his wife. During the weekends it was mainly full as the soldiers would have their girlfriends there and get out the fire escapes sometimes. Anyway Trevor said I couldn't stay there forever as it was costing too much and we had to be given the Bridle Suite, so I asked if I could have job. I was told if I did our room and the big entrance hall and the flowers I could stay for nothing, so that's what I did. One day the manager went up to Melbourne and his wife was busy and said I could help with the office work. Well, when he arrived home there was a terrible row with his wife and I wasn't allowed near the office. I was shocked to find a couple of days later that he was sent for stealing, so then we worked out that he thought I was there to look into things.
We left shortly after this and Trevor was working with the 6th Australian Farm Company where it was hoped to have fresh food for the troops, and Trevor was the Captain in charge of the unit but sad to say he never got his promotion. Because of his Father's illness he had to come back to Tasmania.
I was staying at the Victoria Coffee Palace when we first went to Melbourne, and Trevor was in camp at Puckapunyal. While there he.1 Had tonsillitis and I went by train to see him, and coming home was a bit scary because on Saturday afternoon there was always fighting on the street outside Young and Jacksons Hotel opposite the railway and I had to pass to get to Victoria. I remember Trevor saying he would listen on the radio to it. I was certainly pleased to get back to my room. Trevor came in one night on leave and I couldn't get another room so we decided to share the one room. Before going to sleep we rang and asked to be called at 6am. Anyway the chap rang and said,”6am Sir” and I answered it. The next thing there was a knock on the door and it was the porter and he wanted to know what a man was doing in my room and told Trevor to get out. We told him we were married but I don't think he believed us. Trevor went and a few minutes later there was a knock on the door and I said, “who's there?” and he said, “I have something for you.” Silly me opened the door and this horrible looking porter pushed past me with a tray with toast and a silver tea service on it. He put it on the end of the bed and I said, “Did my husband ask you to bring that?” and he replied, “No”. And came up to me and put his finger under my chin and said, “Mum's the word and when you're finished bring it down to the men's toilets”. All the time I was trying to move towards the door and I promised him I would do as he said. Luckily he went out the door and I locked it, got dressed, packed my bag, threw the toast and coffee away in case it was drugged, took the tray to the ladies as I had to go, then ran down quite a few flights of stairs out onto the street. I never thought till later that I never paid. Here I was at seven in the morning out on the streets of Melbourne, not knowing where I could get a bed as the place was full of Americans and accommodation was nearly impossible.
I was very lucky because during the morning I met the daughter and her grandmother of the man who had built the house in West Hobart and they took me back to Rochester Lodge where they were staying and I managed to get a room there. It was pretty terrible, two old ladies ran it. I had to wipe the iron bed with a pair of my pants before I could sleep in it. Everything was so dirty, you had to leave the light on all night as otherwise you were bitten by bugs. I was bitten and had to go the chemist for something for them. I had to stay until I found something better. Trevor used to come in when he could and I remember daylight saving started and we forgot and went late for breakfast and were we in trouble!
I was very lucky - I went to a lady estate agent and she got me a little flat in East Melbourne. It had one room, bed one end behind a screen and a balcony with a single bed. The kitchen was tiny and shared with a girl and her auntie. One bathroom between about six people, and to go to the toilet we had to go downstairs and then right down the bottom of the yard. Everyone used to have to use the chamber pot in their room and take it down to empty every morning. Trevor got up to his old tricks and put some stuff he made on all the taps and door knobs, and when you touched it it would go off with a bang. You could hear screams from all directions. Another time he put tear gas around and we stayed in our room but eventually Trevor had to open the door and he got a bag of flour thrown over him - what a mess.
While we were there Reg Hawkes sent for Amy and their two year old boy and they slept on the balcony until the landlady complained, so they had to go back home as no one wanted you if there were children. Amy and I used to try everywhere.
When I wanted any potatoes I would have to go to the shop and get a few and then go back again as they would only let you have a few at a time s they were so scarce.
One night we heard a shot and Trevor wanted to get up and have a look but I wouldn't let him. The next day a body was found outside Captain Cook's Cottage in the park close by. While there Trevor got the shingles and he reckoned it was caused by being driven around by an American. Another thing I had to do to get cigarettes for Trevor was to go up one of the small streets near the Victoria where the Americans would sell Camel cigarettes to you but Trevor wouldn't go in uniform.
It was rather sad as Trevor had just trained his men and they were about to go to New Guinea when we got word that his father was dying so we came home. We could only go in one at a time and he had a trained sister to look after him. It was rheumatic fever. On the same boat was his brother Fred. We came home at Christmas time. After being home for several months his father didn't seem to improve. It wasn't until Trevor got his discharge that his father started to improve, but I'm afraid it upset Trevor to do this. I was pregnant when we came home and Lynette was born the following July. It wasn't the best for us as we had to live with Trevor's parents until Lynette was seven months old. She had been born in July. I'm afraid we had our ups and downs and there was a help but she was sacked so I was the help. My Mother came up a couple of times and stayed.
In those days Saturday night was bath night but we only had a couple of tanks so Trevor and I had the same water. The bath was an old enamel thing with half the paint worn off it and it looked dirty all the time. I remember once we went away, can't remember where, and invited a couple back to our place but they weren't impressed with these things so they only stayed one night. I think they thought the bath was dirty, not worn out.
We would do all the cleaning on Saturday and finish at tea time, then a special tea of sausage. Our toilet was a little old shed in the orchard and a dumpty can which had to be emptied, and of course the old pot under the bed. The meat was kept in a safe hanging outside and quite often the flies would get there before us. Another job was churning the butter which was a long job if the weather was warm. We had two big bins in the kitchen and bought a bag of flour and a bag of sugar at the same time. A wooden stove which also heated our water for bathing. All polished floors which I had to do on my hands and knees. To do our washing there was a copper in the wash house outside so that had to be lit, and we had a wooden scrubbing board which we rubbed all our towels and dirty clothes on before sorting them. The clothes line was held up with two prop out in the orchard an quite often the horses would get in and you would have to do the washing again.
It was hard living with Trevor's parents after Lynette was born, Nanna wouldn't let her cry and I'd find her walking up and down the passage at night with her. At night Lynette had to try and sleep in the dining room with the door shut and fire going and Trevor smoking. We didn't have a say as Nanna was boss and it was her house. Thank goodness Nana and Grandpa bought a house in Reibey Street, Ulverstone, when Lynette was seven months old. If they hadn't Trevor said I was to go to Hobart to my mother and he would come down as often as he could as he couldn't have a say in anything either.
Anyway once we were on our own it was great. I used to feed Lynette. And then put her in the pram and go to the dairy and help Trevor with the cows. He also had pigs to feed as well. The worst part was having to come up and get the stove alight to get some hot water and get breakfast. After this I could bath Lynette and get the work done.
Trevor even had the farm valued and we had to pay it off for as long as they both lived. They both lived to a good age so we paid a lot more than need be.
Trevor had applied for a tractor which he eventually got but no rubber tyres and so that was another long wait. He needed them as money was pretty scarce and so he went out doing contract work to help Sometimes I would have to take him to where he was working if he didn't bring the tractor home. He was the first in the district to have rubber tyres and the first farm to have a dam on it.

We used to have a gang of machine men at harvest time for all their meals and we had to prepare them about 15 - 20 for meals and morning and afternoon teas. My first experience was when Nesma Shipworth was expecting the men at her place after ours and she was alone so she sent for Trevor's mother. Well, before leaving she told me to make rock cakes for the men and I didn't have a clue. To make matters worse she did all her cooking with dripping and I had never used a wooden stove. Well, I made the cakes and the machine men said they couldn't break them. We used to make big milk cans full of cold sweetened tea and send them out to where they were working
Before Lynette was born I used to go down and help Trevor to milk and after she arrived I would feed her at 6am and take her to the dairy in the pram. After milking we would have to come up and get the fire alight before we could have breakfast or feed Lynette, or bath her. Trevor's parents left when Lynette was seven months old.
Not long after Trevor's people moved out I had a miscarriage and poor Trevor really worried as the Doctor was new and didn't know where we lived so Trevor had every light on. At last he came and then the ambulance. The mother craft nurse from the clinic was the driver. Trevor had to go out to the post office and ask the girl to come down and stay with Lynette. The next morning I had to have a curette and Trevor brought Lynette in to see me and I was so upset because she hadn't even missed me. When I looked out my window I could see a room across the yard. The door was open and I could see something white on a bed and I found out later it was the morgue. What a view.

Not sure where I was up to in the yarn, but after my Mother gave up her home she came and lived with us. We had a terrible trip to bring her back, had a bed made up on the back seat in the car and she was so ill with cancer, poor old dear. I know now since I have been feeling so sick just how she must have felt, if only we understood before we were like it ourselves. She lived with us until a few weeks before her death and she was one of the first people in St Vincent's home, Ulverstone. During her years with us she had some better health till the last year or so. She used to say I would miss her and she would sit and peel big boilers of potatoes. We would give the workers corn beef and veges and stews and big fruit pies. One morning I had about twenty for a scrambled egg breakfast. Sometimes this would go on for three days.
When Trevor and I were doing the wool festival, Sister Buck came and stayed with Mum as we were out most of the time.
I remember one night Trevor was out and there was a bee in the bedroom and at that time Frank Grainger was living with us and when Trevor came home Frank and myself were chasing it round the bedroom. It did get caught.
I did have a miscarriage before Norman. Later on, in about 20 months time I had twin boys but sad to say we lost one. It was very exciting as I didn't know I was having twins until the first one was born and the Doctor was about to leave when the old Sister Buck said “Good Lord, she is having another one”. They were both under four pounds and prem. I had fallen on the polished floor a few days before.
The hospital here didn't have the facilities to keep them, actually Trevor got the grate mended in their fireplace so they were fine until 17 days old and then we had to take them to Hobart to the home. Those they were just oiled and dressed and never lifted out of their basket. We were told to take a maternity nurse with us. She had her instructions but Lynette was car sick and we went into St Patrick's Inn to clean her up and when we came out the nurse had Trevor in her arms and the car window down so he got pneumonia and died that night, something that should never have happened. Norman was in the home until he was six weeks old and I used to have to express my milk and go out every day, I stayed there the last week. I took him home to my mother's in View Street, Lynette was there and my brother Norman and his wife. I think they were glad when I was able to bring Norman home as he would cry in the night and we weren't allowed to pick him up. Trevor had a loan of Maurie Lakin's car so we drove home and Rita brought Lynette home in the train.
About 17 months later I had Joan, I had two babies really, as Joan was six months old before Norman walked and of course both of them in naps. When Norman was a baby I had a trip to hospital and Trevor had a mother craft nurse to look after Norman. She didn't think she could stay as Norman wouldn't eat; we had to walk around with him in our arms to make him eat anything. After Vivienne was born I had to have a big repair done. I was given 24 hours to live after Viv was born.
I had my mother and my four children and always a boy or a man living in. I did have help at times. Once I had a hysterectomy and one time a lump removed from my breast, also I was very close to death when Vivienne was born and six months later I had a repair op. At this time Ruth Pickford had Vivienne as Trevor's mother had my mother as she was ill in hospital. When Viv was about three years old she went to walk into smoldering fir in Grandpa's yard and Lynette ran and grabbed her and went into it herself and burnt both her feet.

Over the years when the children were in their teens we had some lovely times. The High School children used to come up and do their training in the dam and their parents would come up after work and bring fish and chips, then we would go up to the house and have a coffee and a sing around the piano, as Lynette and Joan both played .
One Xmas eve we had a great barbeque, about a hundred people sat on bales of hay and one chap played the guitar. We finished back at the house for coffee. Some boys got in and whitewashed a couple of cars, so there were some crabby people. Doug and Monica were staying at that time with new baby they had just adopted called Barnaby.
We used to have lots of our friends from Hobart up to stay and of course Rita and Claude. Trevor and Claude took Lynette up the farm in the car one day and they saw something under the car and thought it was water and kept putting their fingers in it to see if it wasn't oil when a little voice piped up and said “I've wet my pants Daddy.”
The children gave us a wonderful 25th wedding anniversary party at the Band Rooms In Ulverstone. It was lovely. Another time we took a caravan and with the Halleys had a lovely stay at St Helens. When we only had Lynette, and later Norman, we went down to my mother's in Hobart a few times and the family loved to see us as I would make butter and we would get rabbits and potatoes and cream and of course these weren't available during the war.
Later on we used to have many people to stay, the Cliftons our next door neighbors in Hobart and Dorrie Wilson whom I worked with and Ruth Brown my old friend from when I went to her place when I was eight years old. She came once and minded the family while I went to Adelaide with Trevor on one of his business trips for the farm.
Another time we took Nana and Grandpa and Lynette with us to Port Augusta and Adelaide. Lynette was very taken with a home for aboriginal children there. She came home and every week with her pocket money she got a present for child in the home and sent them over for Christmas. Ansett took them for free as they thought what a great job she had done.
We had some funny fellows working for us at times, one was an Ex-policeman and he always folded his clothes at night and sat them in the middle of the floor. Another chap lived in the hut and he would usually come home drunk and if any of the family were up he'd come in and join them. Sometimes he was too drunk to get out of the car so then he would stay. I think the car knew the way.
I remember one old man we had in the hut that used to get drunk and I was afraid of him so I would make a big cake for him every week. Another lived in the cottage and was often too drunk to come to work and sometimes at night we would hear him down by the creek calling out and even came up to our bedroom window carrying on. Another couple had the room which is now the lounge room and he used to go to milk with his big overcoat on and look for the fowl eggs and put them in his pocket, the fowls used to run loose at that time. As we found some rotten ones I guess they got a shock when going to use them. His wife used to make a big heap of chocolate marsh mellows and eat and eat them, then we would hear her being sick. They used to sit in their room all the time.
She was supposed to help me but didn't, so Trevor went mad at her one morning and asked her who was having this baby, her or me, as it was just before Joan was born. I used to bean pick later on and at one time we had some peas at the other farm and a friend of Trevor's was staying with us from the Army and there was a small patch the factory didn't want so Lloyd and I used to go over and pick them, then at the end of the day I had to take them to Burnie to sell at a shop there then come home and cook tea for the family, Lloyd included. Another time Lynette landed home with three fellows and I had them as well. Later on they got a caravan and held it in our driveway.
Well Trevor was asked to take Mr Curtis's place at the T.F.F. (Tasmanian Farmers' Federation) in Launceston when he died so we left Norman to manage the farm and moved to Launceston for three years. Came home, lived in the Cottage for a while as Norman and Lesley were in the house. We then bought a house in Thomas Street, East Ulverstone. Lived there until 1997, both of us were sick so went to Coroneagh Hostel, Penguin. Trevor and I had rooms opposite each other. When we first came it was wonderful, looked after well and great food. I improved but poor old Dad didn't, his angina and diabetes were not good, he also had dementia and wasn't allowed to drive the car and I really hated that. I used to take him to Ulverstone and the farm but I didn't have the nerve to go for drives and that did hurt him. If only I could have done it for him. Oh how I wish. After just over two years he passed away at the Burnie Hospital. Only in there for one night. Joan and I left him at nine or ten and they found him gone in the morning at 6am. Oh, I miss him, it's dreadful. I think of all I could have said and done and an extra cuddle now and again.
Dad and I were both sick and moved to Coroneagh Hostel. Poor old Dad didn't like it as he got really sick, angina and diabetes. Just wore out and passed away. Still wish I could go like he did. I used to love it here but now I have nerves and they tell me I'm the only one that can help them, but it's hard. I am lying. I burn up my anus and get very itchy on my back, I keep saying I'm better but so far it hasn't worked, if only it would or I'll go mad.
I find the days and nights very long feeling like I do. I had my bowels checked and the Doctor said they are very good and all these bad things are in my mind. How do I get rid of them? I do try. Every day is the same, wake feeling sick and burning, have breakfast, go to toilet, usually have a little sleep then a shower and perhaps a cuppa. After lunch I always have a sleep, then read a bit and go and see if anyone is having a cuppa, tea time, back to your room, get undressed early and about nine they bring your tablets and rub my itch then I go to sleep, but nearly always have to ring in the night for a cup of hot milk and honey and help sleep and some cream on my itch.

When Dad and I first came here it was like a five star Motel but not now. My pain down below is a lot better but I am either constipated of have diarrhoea, if only I was normal. I take a pain killer and a nerve tablet; I am such a worry wart as they call me.
When Dad was here it was really good to have each other.
I went to stay with Joan. Joan and I had been into the hospital to see Dad and they rang the next morning to say he had passed away. I do miss him. The day after he was buried Joan said she was leaving Philip so imagine what it was like. There were tears all the time. Philip had gone over to Melbourne with Natasha and Joan rang him and said “I have Left”. Viv was home and she came in and said “this is no place for you Mum” so I came back here but before she and Naomi took me to the Pancake Place at Sheffield.
Joan rented a house in Ulverstone, but later went to Hobart. She used to come in every day crying and this didn't help.
A few months later I went to Melbourne to Maria's second wedding and on my return got thrown off the walking escalator and broke my pelvis and some ribs. Went to the Repat Hospital then to the Geelong Hospital as Natasha lived there and she came in every day with the baby to see me. She also bought me home in a chair lift on the plane. I'll never forget it, I felt so ill.
I must stop as it makes me feel sick looking back on these awful times. If only I had been taken, Dad was so lucky. I know I have a lovely family and many great grandchildren but all my family have gone, my dear brother Norman went too and I really loved him. We are well cared for here but what does the future hold for us. It's frightening to think about it. I Have had some counseling and it has helped a little, but sad to say Viv wont speak to Lynette or Norman - If only I knew why, it worries me a lot.1





From 20 January 1943, her married name became Frampton.1 She was a Shop Assistant.1

Children of Marjorie Joan Campbell and Trevor Thornton Frampton

Citations

  1. [S412] Brent Common, online unknown url, Brent Common (unknown location), downloaded 29 January 2011.

Lynette Dianne Frampton1

F, #464560, b. 22 July 1944
Last Edited=4 Feb 2011
     Lynette Dianne Frampton was born on 22 July 1944 at Ulverstone, Tasmania, Australia.1 She was baptised at Sacred Heart Church, Ulverstone, Tasmania, Australia.1 She is the daughter of Trevor Thornton Frampton and Marjorie Joan Campbell.1 She married Terrence William Stuart on 7 November 1964 at Sacred Heart Church, Ulverstone, Tasmania, Australia, in a Roman Catholic service conducted by Fr Lawrence Hore. marriage.1
      Her married name became Stuart.1 She was Mothercraft Nurse/Carer Handicapped and Aged.1

Children of Lynette Dianne Frampton and Terrence William Stuart

Citations

  1. [S412] Brent Common, online unknown url, Brent Common (unknown location), downloaded 29 January 2011.