Roger I, Count of Sicily1

M, #114091, d. 1101
Last Edited=28 Sep 2005
     Roger I, Count of Sicily was the son of Tancred (?).1 He died in 1101.1
     He was created Count of Sicily in 1072, following the capture of Palermo.1

Children of Roger I, Count of Sicily

Citations

  1. [S38] John Morby, Dynasties of the World: a chronological and genealogical handbook (Oxford, Oxfordshire, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1989), page 102. Hereinafter cited as Dynasties of the World.
  2. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 89. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

Stephen II Arpád, King of Hungary1

M, #114092, b. 1101, d. 1131
Last Edited=8 Mar 2007
     Stephen II Arpád, King of Hungary was born in 1101.1 He was the son of Koloman Arpád, King of Hungary and Buzilla of Sicily.1 He married Adelheid of Riedenburg, daughter of Stephen of Riedenburg , Baron of Regensburg, in 1121.1 He died in 1131.1
     He succeeded to the title of King Stephen II of Hungary in 1114.1

Citations

  1. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 89. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

Adelheid of Riedenburg1

F, #114093
Last Edited=20 Aug 2002
     Adelheid of Riedenburg is the daughter of Stephen of Riedenburg , Baron of Regensburg.1 She married Stephen II Arpád, King of Hungary, son of Koloman Arpád, King of Hungary and Buzilla of Sicily, in 1121.1

Citations

  1. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 89. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

Stephen of Riedenburg , Baron of Regensburg1

M, #114094
Last Edited=20 Aug 2002
     Stephen of Riedenburg , Baron of Regensburg gained the title of Baron of Regensburg.1

Child of Stephen of Riedenburg , Baron of Regensburg

Citations

  1. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 89. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

Euphemia of Kiev1

F, #114095, d. 1139
Last Edited=7 Mar 2007
     Euphemia of Kiev was the daughter of Vladimir II Monomakh, Prince of Novgorod and Kiev and Gytha (?).1 She married Koloman Arpád, King of Hungary, son of Geisa I Arpád, King of Hungary and Synadene Synadenos, in 1104.1 She and Koloman Arpád, King of Hungary were divorced in 1113.1 She died in 1139.1

Child of Euphemia of Kiev and Koloman Arpád, King of Hungary

Citations

  1. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 89. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.


John Sigismund, King of Hungary1

M, #114096, d. 1571
Last Edited=8 Mar 2007
     John Sigismund, King of Hungary was the son of John I Zapolya, King of Hungary and Elisabeth of Poland.1 He died in 1571.1
     He succeeded to the title of King John Sigismund of Hungary in 1540.1 He abdicated as King of Hungary in 1570.1 He was styled as Prince of Transylvania from 1570 to 1571.1

Citations

  1. [S38] John Morby, Dynasties of the World: a chronological and genealogical handbook (Oxford, Oxfordshire, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1989), page 160. Hereinafter cited as Dynasties of the World.

Boris Arpád1

M, #114097, b. 1112, d. 1155
Last Edited=20 Aug 2002
     Boris Arpád was born in 1112.1 He was the son of Koloman Arpád, King of Hungary and Euphemia of Kiev.1 He died in 1155, killed in action.1

Citations

  1. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 89. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

Hon. Sir Harold George Nicolson1

M, #114098, b. 21 November 1886, d. 1 May 1968
Last Edited=28 Nov 2012
Sir Harold Nicolson 2
     Hon. Sir Harold George Nicolson was born on 21 November 1886.1 He was the son of Arthur Nicolson, 1st Baron Carnock and Mary Catharine Rowan-Hamilton.1 He married Hon. Victoria Mary Sackville-West, daughter of Lionel Edward Sackville-West, 3rd Baron Sackville and Victoria Sackville-West, on 1 October 1913.3 He died on 1 May 1968 at age 81.1
     He was educated at Wellington College, Berkshire, England.1 He was with the Diplomatic Service between 1909 and 1930.1 He was invested as a Companion, Order of St. Michael and St. George (C.M.G.) in 1920.1 He wrote the book Sweet Waters, published 1921.1 He wrote the book Paul Verlaine, published 1921.1 He wrote the book Tennyson, published 1923.1 He wrote the book Byron, The Last Journey, published 1924.1 He wrote the book Swinburne, published 1926.1 He wrote the book Some People, published 1927.1 He wrote the book Development of English Biography, published 1928.1 He wrote the book Lord Carnock, published 1930.1 He graduated from Balliol College, Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, in 1930 with a Master of Arts (M.A.).1 In 1931 he unsuccessfully contested Combined Universities in the Genral Election for the New Party (Sir Oswald Mosley's party).1 He wrote the book People and Things, published 1931.1 He wrote the book Public Faces, published 1932.1 He wrote the book Peacemaking, 1919, published 1933.1 He wrote the book Curzon: The Last Phase, published 1934.1 He wrote the book Dwight Morrow, published 1935.1 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (National Labour) for Leicester West between 1935 and 1945.1 He wrote the book Small Talk, published 1937.1 He wrote the book Helen's Tower, published 1937.1 He wrote the book Marginal Comment, published 1939.1 He wrote the book Diplomacy, published 1939.1 He held the office of Parliamentary Secretary for the Minister of Information between 1940 and 1941.1 He was Governor of the B.B.C. between 1941 and 1946.1 He was decorated with the award of the Legion of Honour.1 He wrote the book The Congress of Vienna, published 1946.1 He wrote the book Benjamin Constant, published 1949.1 He wrote the book King George V: His Life and Reign, published 1952.1 He was Honorary Fellow in 1953 at Balliol College, Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.1 He was invested as a Knight Commander, Royal Victorian Order (K.C.V.O.) in 1953.1 He wrote the book Journey to Java, published 1957.1 He wrote the book Sainte Beuve, published 1957.1 He wrote the book The Age of Reason, published 1959.1 He wrote the book Monarchy, published 1962.1

Children of Hon. Sir Harold George Nicolson and Hon. Victoria Mary Sackville-West





Citations

  1. [S37] BP2003 volume 1, page 701. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  2. [S300] Michael Rhodes, "re: Ernest Fawbert Collection," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 8 February. Hereinafter cited as "re: Ernest Fawbert Collection."
  3. [S37] BP2003. [S37]

Ladislas I 'the Saint' Arpád, King of Hungary1

M, #114099, d. 1095
Last Edited=8 Mar 2007
     Ladislas I 'the Saint' Arpád, King of Hungary was the son of Béla I Arpád, King of Hungary.1 He married Adelheid von Zähringen, daughter of Berchtold I Herzog von Zähringen.1 He died in 1095.1
     He succeeded to the title of King Ladislas I of Hungary in 1077.1

Child of Ladislas I 'the Saint' Arpád, King of Hungary and Adelheid von Zähringen

Citations

  1. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 89. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

Adelheid von Zähringen1

F, #114100
Last Edited=2 Dec 2002
     Adelheid von Zähringen is the daughter of Berchtold I Herzog von Zähringen.1 She married Ladislas I 'the Saint' Arpád, King of Hungary, son of Béla I Arpád, King of Hungary.1

Child of Adelheid von Zähringen and Ladislas I 'the Saint' Arpád, King of Hungary

Citations

  1. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 89. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.