Ludwig V Graf von Rieneck in Rothenfels1

M, #100841, d. 3 July 1333
Last Edited=8 Feb 2004
     Ludwig V Graf von Rieneck in Rothenfels married Adelheid von Hohenlohe-Weikersheim, daughter of Kraft I von Hohenlohe-Weikersheim and Margareta von Truhendingen, before 12 January 1316.1 He died on 3 July 1333.1

Citations

  1. [S13] Detlev Schwennicke, editor, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschicht der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge: Band XVII (Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Vittorio Klostermann, 1998), tafel 3. Hereinafter cited as Europäische Stammtafeln: Band XVII.

Anne Venables1

F, #100842, b. 7 May 1674, d. 28 April 1715
Last Edited=19 Apr 2003
     Anne Venables was born on 7 May 1674.1 She was the daughter of Peter Venables, Baron of Kinderton and Catharine Shirley.1 She married Montagu Venables-Bertie, 2nd Earl of Abingdon, son of James Bertie, 1st Earl of Abingdon and Eleanora Lee, on 22 September 1687.1 She died on 28 April 1715 at age 40, without issue.1 She was buried at Rycote Chapel.1 She died intestate and her estate was administered on 25 June 1715.1
     She was styled as Baroness Kinderton.1 As a result of her marriage, Anne Venables was styled as Countess of Abingdon on 31 May 1691. She held the office of Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Anne.1

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 47. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

Ulrich I von Hohenlohe-Brauneck1

M, #100843, b. before 1323, d. 1345
Last Edited=8 Feb 2004
     Ulrich I von Hohenlohe-Brauneck was born before 1323.1 He married Adelheid von Hohenlohe-Weikersheim, daughter of Kraft I von Hohenlohe-Weikersheim and Margareta von Truhendingen, before 1 June 1337.1 He died in 1345.1

Citations

  1. [S13] Detlev Schwennicke, editor, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschicht der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge: Band XVII (Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Vittorio Klostermann, 1998), tafel 3. Hereinafter cited as Europäische Stammtafeln: Band XVII.

unknown daughter von Hohenlohe-Weikersheim1

F, #100844, d. after 1323
Last Edited=7 Jun 2004
     unknown daughter von Hohenlohe-Weikersheim was the daughter of Kraft I von Hohenlohe-Weikersheim and Margareta von Truhendingen.1 She died after 1323.1
     She was a member of the House of Hohenlohe.1 She was a nun in 1323 at Rothenburg, Germany.1

Citations

  1. [S13] Detlev Schwennicke, editor, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschicht der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge: Band XVII (Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Vittorio Klostermann, 1998), tafel 3. Hereinafter cited as Europäische Stammtafeln: Band XVII.

Louis I de Clermont, Duc de Bourbon1

M, #100845, b. circa 1279, d. 22 January 1341
Last Edited=27 Oct 2013
Consanguinity Index=0.21%
     Louis I de Clermont, Duc de Bourbon was born circa 1279 at Clermont, Normandy, France. He was the son of Robert de France, Comte de Clermont and Beatrice de Bourgogne.1 He married Marie de Hainaut, daughter of Jean II d'Avesnes, Comte de Hainaut et Graaf van Holland en Zeeland and Philippine von Luxemburg, on 22 September 1310 at Pontoise, France.2 He died on 22 January 1341.
     He gained the title of Comte de la Marche. He gained the title of Duc de Bourbon in 1310.1

Children of Louis I de Clermont, Duc de Bourbon and Marie de Hainaut

Citations

  1. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 67. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.
  2. [S3268] Hans Harmsen, "re: Chester Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 21 August 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Chester Family."
  3. [S16] Louda and MacLagan, Lines of Succession, table 68.


Friedrich Leopold Prinz von Preußen1

M, #100846, b. 16 November 1865, d. 13 September 1931
Last Edited=10 May 2003
Consanguinity Index=4.48%
     Friedrich Leopold Prinz von Preußen was born on 16 November 1865.2 He was the son of Friedrich Karl Nikolaus Prinz von Preußen and Marie Anne Prinzessin von Anhalt-Dessau.1 He married Luise Prinzessin von Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg, daughter of Friedrich Christian August Herzog von Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg and Adelheid Prinzessin zu Hohenlohe-Langenburg, on 24 June 1889.2 He died on 13 September 1931 at age 65 at Flatow, Germany.1
     He gained the title of Prinz von Preußen.1

Children of Friedrich Leopold Prinz von Preußen and Luise Prinzessin von Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg

Citations

  1. [S12] C. Arnold McNaughton, The Book of Kings: A Royal Genealogy, in 3 volumes (London, U.K.: Garnstone Press, 1973), volume 1, page 66. Hereinafter cited as The Book of Kings.
  2. [S12] C. Arnold McNaughton, The Book of Kings, volume 1, page 67.

Marie Anne Prinzessin von Anhalt-Dessau1

F, #100847, b. 14 September 1837, d. 12 May 1906
Last Edited=10 May 2003
Consanguinity Index=0.28%
     Marie Anne Prinzessin von Anhalt-Dessau was born on 14 September 1837 at Dessau, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany.2 She was the daughter of Leopold IV Friedrich Herzog von Anhalt-Dessau and Friederike Wilhelmina Luise Amalie Prinzessin von Preußen.1,2 She married Friedrich Karl Nikolaus Prinz von Preußen, son of Friedrich Karl Alexander Prinz von Preußen and Marie Luise Alexandrine Prinzessin von Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach, on 29 November 1854. She died on 12 May 1906 at age 68 at Friedrichroda, Germany.2
     She gained the title of Prinzessin von Anhalt-Dessau.3

Children of Marie Anne Prinzessin von Anhalt-Dessau and Friedrich Karl Nikolaus Prinz von Preußen

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 311. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S12] C. Arnold McNaughton, The Book of Kings: A Royal Genealogy, in 3 volumes (London, U.K.: Garnstone Press, 1973), volume 1, page 66. Hereinafter cited as The Book of Kings.
  3. [S3] Marlene A. Eilers, Queen Victoria's Descendants (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1987), page 209. Hereinafter cited as Queen Victoria's Descendants.

John George Edward Henry Douglas Sutherland Campbell, 9th Duke of Argyll1

M, #100848, b. 6 August 1845, d. 2 May 1914
Last Edited=11 Feb 2014
Consanguinity Index=0.02%
John Campbell, Marquis of Lorne, 1892 2
     John George Edward Henry Douglas Sutherland Campbell, 9th Duke of Argyll was born on 6 August 1845 at Stafford House, St. James's, Westminster, London, England.1,4 He was the son of George Douglas Campbell, 8th Duke of Argyll and Lady Elizabeth Georgiana Sutherland-Leveson-Gower.1 He married Louise Caroline Alberta Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, Princess of the United Kingdom, daughter of Albert Prinz von Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha and Victoria Alexandrina Hanover, Queen of the United Kingdom, on 21 March 1871.5 He died on 2 May 1914 at age 68 at Kent House, Cowes, Isle of Wight, England, from double pneumonia, without issue.1,6 He was buried on 15 May 1914 at Argyll Mausoleum, Kilmun, Argyllshire, Scotland.6
     He was educated at Eton College, Windsor, Berkshire, England.4 He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge University, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England.4 He held the office of Private Secretary to his father at the India Office between 1868 and 1871.4 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Liberal) for Argyllshire between 1868 and 1878.4 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Thistle (K.T.) on 21 March 1871.4 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) on 17 March 1875.4 He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Order of St. Michael and St. George (G.C.M.G.) on 14 September 1878.4 He held the office of Governor-General of Canada between October 1878 and 1883.7 He was decorated with the award of the Order of the Black Eagle of Prussia.8 He held the office of Constable of Windsor Castle in 1892.7 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Liberal Unionist) for Manchester South between 1895 and 1900.4 He was decorated with the award of the Royal Victorian Chain.8 He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Argyllshire between 1900 and 1914.7 He succeeded to the title of 9th Lord of Inverary, Mull, Morvern and Tirie [S., 1701] on 24 April 1900.4 He succeeded to the title of 9th Viscount of Lochow and Glenyla [S., 1701] on 24 April 1900.4 He succeeded to the title of 9th Duke of Argyll [S., 1701] on 24 April 1900.9 He succeeded to the title of 12th Lord of Kintyre [S., 1626] on 24 April 1900.4 He succeeded to the title of 5th Baron Sundridge, of Coomb Bank, Kent [G.B., 1766] on 24 April 1900.4 He succeeded to the title of 19th Lord Campbell [S., 1445] on 24 April 1900.4 He succeeded to the title of 18th Earl of Argyll [S., 1457] on 24 April 1900.4 He succeeded to the title of 18th Lord Lorne [S., 1470] on 24 April 1900.4 He succeeded to the title of 6th Baron Hamilton of Hameldon, co. Leicester [G.B., 1776] on 24 April 1900.4 He succeeded to the title of 9th Earl of Campbell and Cowall [S., 1701] on 24 April 1900.4 He succeeded to the title of 9th Marquess of Kintyre and Lorn [S., 1701] on 24 April 1900.4 He succeeded to the title of 2nd Duke of Argyll [U.K., 1892] on 24 April 1900.4 He succeeded to the title of 11th Baronet Campbell, of Lundy in Angus, co. Forfar [N.S., 1627] on 24 April 1900.10 He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Royal Victorian Order (G.C.V.O.) on 2 February 1901.7 He was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Law (LL.D.) by Cambridge University, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, in 1902.8 He was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Law (LL.D.) by University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland, in 1907.8 He held the office of Chancellor of the Order of St. Michael and St. George.8 He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.11
     

Citations

  1. [S3] Marlene A. Eilers, Queen Victoria's Descendants (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1987), page 207. Hereinafter cited as Queen Victoria's Descendants.
  2. [S300] Michael Rhodes, "re: Ernest Fawbert Collection," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 8 February. Hereinafter cited as "re: Ernest Fawbert Collection."
  3. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  4. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 212. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  5. [S3] Marlene A. Eilers, Queen Victoria's Descendants, page 206.
  6. [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 35. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.
  7. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 213.
  8. [S8] BP1999 volume 1, page 105. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S8]
  9. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 211.
  10. [S15] George Edward Cokayne, editor, The Complete Baronetage, 5 volumes (no date (c. 1900); reprint, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1983), volume II, page 334. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Baronetage.
  11. [S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995), Campbell, John George. Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.

Frederick Augustus Hanover, 1st Duke of York1

M, #100849, b. 16 August 1763, d. 5 January 1827
Last Edited=22 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=1.29%
Frederick Augustus, 1st Duke of York
by Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1788 2
     Frederick Augustus Hanover, 1st Duke of York was born on 16 August 1763 at St. James's Palace, St. James's, London, England.1 He was the son of George III Hanover, King of Great Britain and Sophie Charlotte Herzogin von Mecklenburg-Strelitz. He was baptised on 14 September 1763 at St. James's Palace, St. James's, London, England.1 He married Friederike Charlotte Ulrike Katherine Prinzessin von Preußen, daughter of Friedrich Wilhelm II König von Preußen and Elisabeth Christina Ulrike Herzogin von Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel, on 29 September 1791 at Berlin-Charlottenburg, Brandenburg, Germany.4 He died on 5 January 1827 at age 63 at Rutland House, Arlington Street, St. James's, London, England, from dropsy.4 He was buried on 20 January 1828.4
     He gained the title of HRH Prince Frederick of Great Britain and Ireland on 16 August 1763.1 He gained the title of Herzog von Braunschweig-Lüneburg on 16 August 1763.1 He held the office of Prince Bishop of Osnabrück between 27 February 1764 and 1784.1 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Bath (K.B.) on 30 December 1767.1 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) on 19 June 1771.5 He gained the rank of Colonel on 1 November 1780 in the service of the British Army.1 He gained the rank of Major-General on 20 November 1782.1 He gained the rank of Lieutenant-General on 27 October 1784.1 He was created 1st Earl of Ulster [Ireland] on 29 November 1784.1 He was created 1st Duke of York [Great Britain] on 29 November 1784.1 He was created 1st Duke of Albany [Great Britain] on 29 November 1784.1 He was Commander in Chief of the Forces in the United Provinces on 23 February 1793.6 He gained the rank of General on 12 April 1793.6 He fought in the capture of Valenciennes on 28 July 1793.1 He fought in the Battle of Beaumont on 26 April 1794, where he won a notable victory.1 He fought in the Battle of Willems on 10 May 1794, where he won another victory.6 He fought in the Battle of Tourcoing on 17 May 1794, where he was exposed to certain defeat by the Austrians, compelling him to fall back with the Allied Army to Holland.6 He gained the rank of Field Marshal on the Staff on 10 February 1795, i.e. Head of the Army.6 He gained the rank of Field Marshal on 10 February 1795.6 He was Commander-in-Chief of the forces in Great Britain on 3 April 1798.6 He was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Civil Laws (D.C.L.) by Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, on 18 June 1799.6 He fought in the abortive expedition to the Helder between September 1799 and October 1799, which ended in the Convention of Alkemaar.6 He was Captain-General of the Forces on 4 September 1799.6 He was Commander in Chief of the Forces in Great Britain and Ireland between 9 June 1801 and March 1809.6 He held the office of Keeper of Windsor Forest on 10 September 1805. He held the office of Warden of the New Forest on 10 September 1805.6 He and Mary Anne Clarke were associated circa 1809.6 He was Commander-in-Chief of the forces in Great Britain on 25 May 1811.6 He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Order of the Bath (G.C.B.) on 2 January 1815.6 He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Hanoverian Order (G.C.H.) on 12 August 1815.4
     'It is a foible of history that the Duke is now chiefly remembered in the public mind as a man who marched his army up and down a hill and ran it, as a commercial proposition, with the aid of his mistress. Nevertheless, his was the responsibility for Home Defence throughout almost the whole of the Napoleonic Wars; he was twice thanked by Parliament (1814 and 1815) for the great benefits he had conferred on the Army; he established those military schools which were afterwards known as the Staff College and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; and he founded the Duke of York's School for Soldiers' children'. Sir Arthur Wellesley testified at the Clarke Investigation of 1809 'that under the establishments formed under the direction of H.R.H., the officers are improved in knowledge; that the staff of the army is very much better ... that the cavalry is improved ... that the system of subordination among the officers ... is better ... that the whole system of ... the interior economy of the regiments, and everything that relates to the military discipline of the soldiers and the military efficiency of the army has been greatly improved since H.R.H. was appointed Commander-in-Chief'. Sir John Fortescue wrote 'no one could question his ability, his industry, or his public spirit. No one could dispute that the military forces of the country, when he first took them over, were confounded and corrupted by the jobs of politicians and the reckless experiments of civil empirics. It was he who had reduced choas to order, restored discipline and ... confidence, and made the British Army the most efficient in the world.4'
     The Count of Mirabeau writes from Brunswick of 'the Duke of York, a puissant hunter, a potentn drinker, an indefatibable laugher, destitute of breeding and politeness, and who possesses, at least in appearance, much of the Duke de Lausun, as well in mind as in person ... I find in him all the stiffness of a German Prince, with a double dose of English insolence, but wanting the free cordiality of that nation'. Baron Stockmar writes of him as 'tall, with immense embonpoint, and not proportionately strong legs; he holds himself in such a way that one is always afraid he will tumble over backwards; very bald and not a very intelligent face'. Greville writes that he 'is not clever, but he has a justness of understanding ... He is the only one of the Princes who has the feelings of an English gentleman; his amiable disposition and excellent temper have conciliated for him the esteem and regard of men of all parties ... [who have] implicit confidence ... in his truth, straighforwardness, and sincerity ... He is very easily amused, and particularly with jokes full of coarseness and indelicacy ... The Duke and the Duchess live upon the best terms ... Their friends are common to both'.7

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, page 921. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  3. [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 923.
  5. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 286. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 922.
  7. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 924.

William IV Hanover, King of the United Kingdom1

M, #100850, b. 21 August 1765, d. 20 June 1837
Last Edited=22 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=1.29%
HM King William IV of the United Kingdom2
     William IV Hanover, King of the United Kingdom was born on 21 August 1765 at Buckingham Palace, St. James's, London, England.4 He was the son of George III Hanover, King of Great Britain and Sophie Charlotte Herzogin von Mecklenburg-Strelitz.1 He was baptised on 20 September 1765 at St. James's Palace, St. James's, London, England.1 He married Adelheid Luise Therese Karoline Amelie Prinzessin von Sachsen-Meiningen, daughter of Georg I Friedrich Karl Herzog von Sachsen-Meiningen und Hildburghausen and Luise Eleonore Prinzessin zu Hohenlohe-Langenburg, on 13 July 1818 at Kew Palace, Kew, London, England.5 He died on 20 June 1837 at age 71 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.6 He was buried on 8 July 1837.7
     He and Elizabeth King were associated.3 He was given the name of William Henry at birth. William IV Hanover, King of the United Kingdom also went by the nick-name of 'the Sailor King'. He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Thistle (K.T.) on 5 April 1770.4 He was commissioned in May 1779, in the service of the Royal Navy.1 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) on 19 April 1782.5 He gained the rank of Post Captain in 1786.1 He was the best man at the wedding of Admiral Horatio Nelson, 1st and last Viscount Nelson of the Nile and Burnham Thorpe and Frances Herbert Woolward on 22 March 1787 at Montpelier, St. Nevis.8 He was created 1st Duke of St. Andrews [Great Britain] on 20 May 1789.1 He was created 1st Earl of Munster [Ireland] on 20 May 1789.1 He was created 1st Duke of Clarence [Great Britain] on 20 May 1789.5 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) on 23 June 1789.1 He gained the rank of Rear-Admiral in 1790.1 He and Dorothea Bland were associated between 1790 and 1810.9 He was invested as a Fellow, Society of Antiquaries (F.S.A.) on 3 February 1791.1 He gained the rank of Vice-Admiral in 1794.1 He held the office of Ranger of Greenwich Park between 1794 and 1797.1 He held the office of Ranger of Bushy Park between 1797 and 1830.1 He gained the rank of Admiral in 1799.1 He gained the rank of Admiral of the Fleet in 1811.1 He was decorated with the award of the Knight, Order of Sainte Espirit of France on 24 April 1814.1 He was decorated with the award of the Knight, Order of St. Andrew of Russia.1 He was decorated with the award of the Knight, Order of the Black Eagle of Prussia.1 He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Order of the Bath (G.C.B.) on 2 January 1815.1 He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Hanoverian Order (G.C.H.) on 12 August 1815.1 He was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.) by Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, on 18 October 1816.1 He gained the rank of General of Marines in 1823.1 He was invested as a Fellow, Royal Society (F.R.S.) on 26 April 1827.1 He held the office of Lord High Admiral between May 1827 and August 1828.1 He succeeded to the title of King William IV of the United Kingdom on 26 June 1830.10 He was crowned King of the United Kingdom on 8 September 1831 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England, and styled 'By the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith.10' He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.11
     

Child of William IV Hanover, King of the United Kingdom and Caroline von Linsingen

Children of William IV Hanover, King of the United Kingdom and Dorothea Bland

Children of William IV Hanover, King of the United Kingdom and Adelheid Luise Therese Karoline Amelie Prinzessin von Sachsen-Meiningen

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 261. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  3. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 302. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  5. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 303.
  6. [S5] Dulcie M. Ashdown, Victoria and the Coburgs (London, U.K.: Robert Hale, 1981), page 67. Hereinafter cited as Victoria and the Coburgs.
  7. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 304.
  8. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 463.
  9. [S8] BP1999 volume 2, page 2035. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S8]
  10. [S4] C.F.J. Hankinson, editor, DeBretts Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Companionage, 147th year (London, U.K.: Odhams Press, 1949), page 22. Hereinafter cited as DeBretts Peerage, 1949.
  11. [S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995), reference "William IV, 1765-1837". Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.
  12. [S8] BP1999. [S8]
  13. [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 153. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.