Archibald Campbell, 1st Marquess of Argyll1

M, #109541, b. between August 1605 and April 1607, d. 27 May 1661
Last Edited=26 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.91%
Archibald Campbell, 1st Marquess of Argyll
by David Scougall, 1650 2
     Archibald Campbell, 1st Marquess of Argyll was born between August 1605 and April 1607.3 He was the son of Archibald Campbell, 7th Earl of Argyll and Lady Agnes Douglas.3 He married Lady Margaret Douglas, daughter of William Douglas, 7th Earl of Morton and Lady Anne Keith, circa 6 August 1626.4 He died on 27 May 1661 at Cross of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, executed, with his head then exposed on the top of the Tolbooth (in the place of Montrose's).4 He was buried on 8 June 1661 at Kilmun, Cowal.4
     He matriculated at St. Andrews University, St. Andrews, Fife, Scotland, on 15 January 1622.3 He held the office of Hereditary Justice General [Scotland] between 1625 and 1628.3 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) on 12 June 1628.3 He held the office of an Extraordinary Lord of Session on 14 January 1634.3 He succeeded to the title of 8th Earl of Argyll [S., 1457] in 1638.3 He succeeded to the title of 8th Lord Lorne [S., 1470] in 1638.3 He succeeded to the title of 9th Lord Campbell [S., 1445] in 1638.3 In 1639 he sent 500 Highlanders to swell the Covenanters at Aberdeen, and the following year swept through Atholl, Badenoch and Angus with 'fire and sword.3' In 1641 he made peace with King Charles I when he came to Scotland.3 He was created 1st Marquess of Argyll [Scotland] on 15 November 1641.3 He again joined the Covenanters.3 He fought in the Battle of Inverlochy on 2 February 1644/45, where he was defeated.3 He fought in the Battle of Kilsyth on 15 August 1645, where he was defeated by Montrose.3 He succeeded to the title of 2nd Lord of Kintyre [S., 1626] in September 1645.4 In October 1648 he conducted Cromwell to Edinburgh, where the Covenant was renewed.3 In June 1650 he assisted in bringing King Charles II to Scotland.3 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Aberdeenshire from 1658 to 1659.3 He was present at the proclamation of Cromwell as Lord Protector, and signed a promise to live peacably under that government. In July 1660 he went to London to wait on the newly arrived King Charles II, but he was ordered to the Tower, and then taken back to Edinburgh Castle.4 On 25 May 1661 he was tried for high treason, and was attainted, with all of his honours forfeit.4
     His lordship, who was so deeply engaged in the Scottish affairs of his time, and generally so mysteriously, that to treat of his career would produce rather a series of conjectures than of facts, acted a prominent part during the Civil War, was the first Commissioner from Scotland to the parliament of England, and Commander-in-Chief of the Covenators, when defeated by Montrose at Inverlochie and Kilsyth in 1645; but after the King's murder, when Scotland as with one voice, demanded the acknowledgment of Charles II, Argyll asserted His Majesty's cause, and at the King's coronation at Scone, 1 Jan. 1650/1, had the honour of placing the Crown upon His Majesty's head. Subsequently, however, he assisted in the ceremony of proclaiming Cromwell, Protector, and signed an engagement to support his Government. On the restoration of the monarchy, the Marquess immediately repaired to London, for the purpose of congratulating the King; but His Majesty, refusing to see him, ordered his committal to the Tower, where he remained until the December following, when he was sent back to Scotland by sea, and narrowly escaped shipwreck. He was soon afterwards tried for High Treason, and condemned to death, 25 May, 1661. In two days subsequently, he wrote a long letter to the King, vindicating his memory, and imploring protection for his poor wife and family, dined at noon with his friends with great cheerfulness, and was accompanied by several of the nobility to the scaffold, where, after an interval of devotion, his head was struck off by the 'maiden' at the market-cross of Edinburgh. According to Gibbs, he was "a small, wiry, squinting, blue eyed, red haired man, with a high forehead and hooked nose."4 He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.5
     

Children of Archibald Campbell, 1st Marquess of Argyll and Lady Margaret Douglas

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IV, page 438. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 203.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 204.
  5. [S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995), Campbell, Archibald. Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.
  6. [S8] BP1999 volume 1, page 104. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S8]
  7. [S37] BP2003 volume 1, page 135. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  8. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 292.

James Douglas, Earl of Angus1

M, #109542, b. 1671, d. 3 August 1692
Last Edited=4 Sep 2008
Consanguinity Index=0.45%
     James Douglas, Earl of Angus was born in 1671.1 He was the son of James Douglas, 2nd Marquess of Douglas and Lady Barbara Erskine.1 He died on 3 August 1692 at Steinkirk killed in action.1
     He was styled as Earl of Angus between 1671 and 1692.1 He gained the rank of Colonel in the service of the 26th Foot, or Cameronians.1 He fought in the Battle of Steinkirk on 3 August 1692.1

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IV, page 439. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

William Douglas, Earl of Angus1

M, #109543, b. 15 October 1693, d. 20 May 1694
Last Edited=20 Nov 2008
Consanguinity Index=0.53%
     William Douglas, Earl of Angus was born on 15 October 1693.1 He was the son of James Douglas, 2nd Marquess of Douglas and Lady Mary Kerr.1 He died on 20 May 1694.1 He was buried at Douglas, Scotland.1
     He was styled as Earl of Angus from 1693 to 1694.1

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IV, page 439. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

Archibald Douglas, 1st Duke of Douglas1

M, #109544, b. between July 1694 and September 1694, d. 21 July 1761
Last Edited=20 Nov 2008
Consanguinity Index=0.53%
     Archibald Douglas, 1st Duke of Douglas was born between July 1694 and September 1694.1 He was the son of James Douglas, 2nd Marquess of Douglas and Lady Mary Kerr.1 He was baptised on 13 October 1694.1 He married Margaret Douglas, daughter of James Douglas and Isabel Corbet, on 1 March 1758.1 He died on 21 July 1761 at Queensberry House, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, dsp.1 He was buried on 4 August 1761 at Douglas, Scotland.1
     He was styled as Earl of Angus between 1695 and 1700.1 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Earl of Angus [S., 1633] on 25 February 1699/0.1 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Lord Abernethy and Jedburgh Forest [S., 1633] on 25 February 1699/0.1 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Marquess of Douglas [S., 1633] on 25 February 1699/0.1 He was created 1st Marquess of Angus and Abernethy [Scotland] on 10 April 1703.1 He was created 1st Duke of Douglas [Scotland] on 10 April 1703.1 He was created 1st Viscount of Jedburgh Forest [Scotland] on 10 April 1703.1 He was created 1st Lord Douglas of Bonkill, Prestoun and Robertoun [Scotland] on 10 April 1703.1 In 1715 he aided the Government during the Rising.1 He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Forfarshire between 1715 and 1761.1 He fought in the Battle of Sheriffmuir on 13 November 1715, serving as a volunteer.1 In 1725 he either murdered, or accidently killed, John Ker, who was staying with him at Douglas Castle. Immediately after this event, the Duke fled to Holland.1 In December 1758 Douglas Castle burnt down, and was afterwards rebuilt by the Duke, using the architect Adam.1
     On his death, the Dukedom became extinct. The titles Marquess of Douglas and the Earldom of Angus devolved upon his heir male, the 7th Duke of Hamilton descended from William, Earl of Selkirk, afterwards Duke of Hamilton, 4th son of the 1st, Marquess of Douglas. 019276.2 He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of Nationary Biography.3
     

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IV, page 439. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S37] BP2003 volume 2, page 1743. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  3. [S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995). Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.

Margaret Douglas1

F, #109545, d. 24 October 1774
Last Edited=14 Apr 2008
     Margaret Douglas was the daughter of James Douglas and Isabel Corbet.1 She married Archibald Douglas, 1st Duke of Douglas, son of James Douglas, 2nd Marquess of Douglas and Lady Mary Kerr, on 1 March 1758.1 She died on 24 October 1774 at Bothwell Castle, Lanarkshire, Scotland.1
     As a result of her marriage, Margaret Douglas was styled as Duchess of Douglas on 1 March 1758.2
     "Good-looking, though not handsome, with an eccentrick and coarse manner (not devoid of wit), a manly courage, and most enterprising temper." Dr. Johnson met her in Edinburgh in 1773, writing "an old lady who talks broad Scotch with a paralytic voice, and is scarcely nderstood by her own countrymen." She was a well-known leader of Scottish society in her time. "The last of the nobility to be attended by halberdiers when going about the country. When she visited she left her dress behind as a present."2

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IV, page 439. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IV, page 440.


James Douglas1

M, #109546, d. 1743
Last Edited=14 Apr 2008
     James Douglas was the son of John Campbell and Mary Douglas.2 He married, firstly, Isabel Corbet, daughter of Hugh Corbet.2 He married, secondly, Rebecca Wallace.2 He died in 1743.2
      His name was legally changed to James Douglas.2 He was given the name of James Campbell at birth.2 He lived at Mains, Dunbartonshire, Scotland.1
     He had two sons and four daughters by his second wife.2

Children of James Douglas and Isabel Corbet

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IV, page 439. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 31. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.

Isabel Corbet1

F, #109547
Last Edited=15 Sep 2008
     Isabel Corbet was the daughter of Hugh Corbet.1 She married James Douglas, son of John Campbell and Mary Douglas.2
      Her married name became Douglas.2 She was also known as Isobel Corbet.2

Children of Isabel Corbet and James Douglas

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IV, page 439. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 31. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.

Hugh Corbet1

M, #109548
Last Edited=15 Sep 2008
     Hugh Corbet lived at Hardgray, Scotland.1

Child of Hugh Corbet

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IV, page 439. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

Sir George William Campbell, 6th Duke of Argyll1

M, #109549, b. 22 September 1768, d. 22 October 1839
Last Edited=26 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.0%
     Sir George William Campbell, 6th Duke of Argyll was born on 22 September 1768.1 He was the son of Field Marshal John Campbell, 5th Duke of Argyll and Elizabeth Gunning, Baroness Hamilton of Hameldon.1 He was baptised on 20 October 1768.2 He married Lady Caroline Elizabeth Villiers, daughter of George Bussy Villiers, 4th Earl of the Island of Jersey and Frances Twysden, on 29 November 1810 at Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.2 He died on 22 October 1839 at age 71 at Inverary Castle, Argyllshire, Scotland, without legitimate issue.3 He was buried on 10 November 1839 at Kilmun, Cowal.3
     He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Whig) for St. Germans between 1790 and 1796.2 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Baron Hamilton of Hameldon, co. Leicester [G.B., 1776] on 2 August 1799.2 He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Argyllshire between 1800 and 1839.2 He succeeded to the title of 2nd Baron Sundridge, of Coomb Bank, Kent [G.B., 1766] on 24 May 1806.2 He succeeded to the title of 9th Lord of Kintyre [S., 1626] on 24 May 1806.4 He succeeded to the title of 6th Marquess of Kintyre and Lorn [S., 1701] on 24 May 1806. He succeeded to the title of 8th Baronet Campbell, of Lundy in Angus, co. Forfar [N.S., 1627] on 24 May 1806.5 He succeeded to the title of 6th Earl of Campbell and Cowall [S., 1701] on 24 May 1806.4 He succeeded to the title of 6th Viscount of Lochow and Glenyla [S., 1701] on 24 May 1806.4 He succeeded to the title of 6th Duke of Argyll [S., 1701] on 24 May 1806.1 He succeeded to the title of 6th Marquess of Kintyre and Lorn [S., 1701] on 24 May 1806.4 He succeeded to the title of 15th Earl of Argyll [S., 1457] on 24 May 1806.4 He succeeded to the title of 15th Lord Lorne [S., 1470] on 24 May 1806.4 He succeeded to the title of 6th Lord of Inverary, Mull, Morvern and Tirie [S., 1701] on 24 May 1806.4 He succeeded to the title of 16th Lord Campbell [S., 1445] on 24 May 1806.4 He held the office of Vice-Admiral of the West Coast in 1807.2 He held the office of Keeper of the Great Seal [Scotland] between 1827 and 1828.2 He held the office of Keeper of the Great Seal [Scotland] between 1830 and 1839.2 He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Hanoverian Order (G.C.H.) in 1833.2 He held the office of Lord Steward of the Household to King William IV between 1833 and 1834.2 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) on 11 September 1833.2 He held the office of Lord Steward of the Household to HM Queen Victoria between 1835 and 1839.2

Child of Sir George William Campbell, 6th Duke of Argyll

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume VI, page 280. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 210.
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 211.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 209.
  5. [S15] George Edward Cokayne, editor, The Complete Baronetage, 5 volumes (no date (c. 1900); reprint, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1983), volume II, page 334. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Baronetage.
  6. [S8] BP1999 volume 1, page 105. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S8]

Margaret Stewart, Countess of Angus1

F, #109550, d. before 23 March 1417/18
Last Edited=30 Sep 2012
Consanguinity Index=0.0%
     Margaret Stewart, Countess of Angus was the daughter of Thomas Stewart, 2nd Earl of Angus and Margaret Sinclair.1 She married Thomas, 9th Earl of Mar, son of Donald, 8th Earl of Mar and Isabella Stewart, between 1361 and 1374.1 She died before 23 March 1417/18.1
     She succeeded to the title of 3rd Countess of Angus [S., 1329] in 1361, suo jure.1,2 As a result of her marriage, Margaret Stewart, Countess of Angus was styled as Countess of Mar.1 She resigned as Countess of Angus, in favour of the father of her children, George Douglas, reserving for herself the frank tenement thereof for life on 9 April 1389.1

Child of Margaret Stewart, Countess of Angus and William Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 154. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 26. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.