Nataliya Hohenfelsen, Countess Hohenfelsen1

F, #102001, b. 5 December 1905, d. 27 December 1981
Last Edited=7 Apr 2014
Princess Natalia Paley 2
     Nataliya Hohenfelsen, Countess Hohenfelsen was born on 5 December 1905 at Paris, France. She was the daughter of Pavel Aleksandrovich Romanov, Grand Duke of Russia and Olga Valerianovna Karnovich. She married Lucien Lelong on 10 August 1927 at Paris, France. She and Lucien Lelong were divorced in 1937. She married John Chapman Wilson in 1937. She died on 27 December 1981 at age 76 at New York, U.S.A..
     She gained the title of Countess Hohenfelsen.1 She gained the title of Princess Nataliya Paley.1

Citations

  1. [S12] C. Arnold McNaughton, The Book of Kings: A Royal Genealogy, in 3 volumes (London, U.K.: Garnstone Press, 1973), volume 1, page 309. Hereinafter cited as The Book of Kings.
  2. [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Georgii Mikhailovich Brassov, Count Brassov1

M, #102002, b. 24 July 1910, d. 22 July 1931
Last Edited=10 May 2003
     Georgii Mikhailovich Brassov, Count Brassov was born on 24 July 1910 at Vienna, Austria.1 He was the son of Mikhail Aleksandrovich Romanov, Grand Duke of Russia and Nataliya Sergeievna Cheremetevskaya. He died on 22 July 1931 at age 20 at Auxerre, France, killed in a road accident.1
     He gained the title of Count Brassov.1

Citations

  1. [S12] C. Arnold McNaughton, The Book of Kings: A Royal Genealogy, in 3 volumes (London, U.K.: Garnstone Press, 1973), volume 1, page 302. Hereinafter cited as The Book of Kings.

Peter Friedrich Georg von Holstein-Gottorp, Duke of Oldenburg1

M, #102003, b. 21 November 1868, d. 11 March 1924
Last Edited=10 May 2003
Consanguinity Index=2.99%
     Peter Friedrich Georg von Holstein-Gottorp, Duke of Oldenburg was born on 21 November 1868 [9 Nov 1868 O.S.] at St. Petersburg, Russia.1 He was the son of Alexander Friedrich Constantine von Holstein-Gottorp, Duke of Oldenburg and Evgenya Maksimilianovna Herzogin von Leuchtenberg.2 He married, firstly, Olga Aleksandrovna Romanov, Grand Duchess of Russia, daughter of Aleksandr III Aleksandrovich Romanov, Tsar of Russia and Marie Sophie Frederikke Dagmar zu Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, Princess of Denmark, on 21 July 1901 at Gatchina, Russia.1 He and Olga Aleksandrovna Romanov, Grand Duchess of Russia were divorced on 16 October 1916 by Imperial Ukase.1 He married, secondly, Olga Vladimirovna Ratkova-Rognova, daughter of Vladimir Ratkova-Rognova, on 3 May 1922 at Biarritz, France.1 He was also reported to have been married on 27 July 1901. He died on 11 March 1924 at age 55 at Biarritz, France.1
     He gained the title of Duke of Oldenburg.2 He gained the title of Prince Peter of Oldenburg.2 From 21 July 1901, his married name became Petr Alexandrovich von Holstein-Gottorp.

Citations

  1. [S12] C. Arnold McNaughton, The Book of Kings: A Royal Genealogy, in 3 volumes (London, U.K.: Garnstone Press, 1973), volume 1, page 216. Hereinafter cited as The Book of Kings.
  2. [S12] C. Arnold McNaughton, The Book of Kings, volume 1, page 215.

Elena Vladimirovna Romanov, Grand Duchess of Russia1

F, #102004, b. 29 January 1882, d. 13 March 1957
Last Edited=24 Feb 2007
Consanguinity Index=3.69%
Grand Duchess Elena of Russia2
     Elena Vladimirovna Romanov, Grand Duchess of Russia was born on 29 January 1882 [17 Jan 1882 O.S.] at Tsarskoie Selo, Russia.3 She was the daughter of Vladimir Aleksandrovitch Romanov, Grand Duke of Russia and Marie Alexandrine Elisabeth Eleonore Herzogin von Mecklenburg-Schwerin. She married Nicholaos zu Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, Prince of Greece and Denmark, son of William George I zu Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, King of the Hellenes and Olga Konstantinovna Romanova, Grand Duchess of Russia, on 29 August 1902 at Tsarskoie Selo, Russia.3 She died on 13 March 1957 at age 75 at Athens, Greece.3
     She gained the title of Grand Duchess Elena Vladimirovna of Russia.1

Citations

  1. [S3] Marlene A. Eilers, Queen Victoria's Descendants (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1987), page 175. Hereinafter cited as Queen Victoria's Descendants.
  2. [S300] Michael Rhodes, "re: Ernest Fawbert Collection," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 8 February. Hereinafter cited as "re: Ernest Fawbert Collection."
  3. [S12] C. Arnold McNaughton, The Book of Kings: A Royal Genealogy, in 3 volumes (London, U.K.: Garnstone Press, 1973), volume 1, page 197. Hereinafter cited as The Book of Kings.

Amalie Friederike Prinzessin von Hessen-Darmstadt1

F, #102005, b. 20 June 1754, d. 21 July 1832
Last Edited=13 May 2012
Amale Friederike Prinzessin von Hessen-Darmstadt
by G. H. Schröder, 1811 2
     Amalie Friederike Prinzessin von Hessen-Darmstadt was born on 20 June 1754 at Prenzlau, Brandenburg, Germany. She was the daughter of Ludwig IX Landgraf von Hessen-Darmstadt and Karoline Henriette Christina Louisa Pfalzgräfin von Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld.4 She married Karl Ludwig Markgraf von Baden, son of Karl Friedrich Großherzog von Baden and Carolina Luise von Hessen-Darmstadt, on 15 July 1774 at Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany.1 She died on 21 July 1832 at age 78.

Children of Amalie Friederike Prinzessin von Hessen-Darmstadt and Karl Ludwig Markgraf von Baden

Citations

  1. [S12] C. Arnold McNaughton, The Book of Kings: A Royal Genealogy, in 3 volumes (London, U.K.: Garnstone Press, 1973), volume 1, page 40. Hereinafter cited as The Book of Kings.
  2. [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  3. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  4. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 84. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.
  5. [S3380] Patricia Ruijzendaal, "re: Austrian Royalty," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 19 November 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Austrian Royalty."
  6. [S37] BP2003 volume 2, page 2693. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]


John I 'Lackland', King of England1

M, #102006, b. 24 December 1167, d. 19 October 1216
Last Edited=21 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.46%
King John I of England
by Renold Elstrick 2
     John I 'Lackland', King of England was born on 24 December 1167 at Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.1 He was the son of Henry II 'Curtmantle' d'Anjou, King of England and Eleanor, Duchesse d'Aquitaine. He married, firstly, Isabella de Clare, Countess of Gloucester, daughter of William fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Hawise de Beaumont, on 29 August 1189 at Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England.1 He and Isabella de Clare, Countess of Gloucester were divorced in 1199, on the grounds of consanguinity.1 He married, firstly, Isabella d'Angoulême, daughter of Aymer Taillefer, Comte d'Angoulême and Alice de Courtenay, on 24 August 1200 at Bordeaux Cathedral, Bordeaux, Dauphine, France.3 He died on 19 October 1216 at age 48 at Newark Castle, Newark, Nottinghamshire, England.4 He was buried at Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Worcestershire, England.4
     He and Adela de Warenne were associated.5 He gained the title of King John I of Ireland in 1177.1 He gained the title of Count of Mortain in 1189.1 As a result of his marriage, John I 'Lackland', King of England was styled as Earl of Gloucester on 29 August 1189.1 He succeeded to the title of King John I of England on 6 April 1199.1 He was crowned King of England on 27 May 1199 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England, and styled 'Rex Anglaie, Dominus Hiberniae, Dux Normanniae, et Dux Aquitaniae.6'
     He was a skilled politician and forceful administrator, but one of England's most unpopular monarchs due to his cruelty and deceit. While Richard I was imprisoned abroad, in 1193 John vainly attempted to usurp the throne. He was banished, but soon reconciled and made his brother's heir. On Richard's death, John became king and imprisoned his young nephew Arthur of Brittany, a better claimant who soon died in prison. He married Isabella of Gloucester and then divorced her after his accession to the throne and married Isabella of Angouleme. John imposed crippling taxes and tightened the already severe forest laws, all to raise revenue for his war against the French. This war cost him Normandy and led to high inflation resulting in widespread poverty. He antagonised the Church bringing on an interdict from the Pope, and John himself was excommunicated. The whole population, high and low alike, were in a state of near rebellion. The barons drew up a document which they were intent upon John signing. This document was not a formal constitution but a practical statement that the King must respect institutional customs and law. On Monday 15 June 1215 King John reluctantly signed and sealed the document on the island of Runnymeade in the Thames. This was one of the most memorable events in English history, the document being known as the Magna Carta. Afterwards, John reverted to his bad old ways and Louis, son of the French King, was invited to replace him. Louis entered London unopposed in May 1216 and civil war began to flame. Fortunately for England, John died of dysentry on Wednesday 19 October 1216 at Newark after losing the crown jewels in the Wash. He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.7
     

Child of John I 'Lackland', King of England and Agatha de Ferrers

Child of John I 'Lackland', King of England and Clementina (?)

Children of John I 'Lackland', King of England and Isabella d'Angoulême

Child of John I 'Lackland', King of England and Adela de Warenne

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 65. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  3. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 66.
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 71.
  5. [S79] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry (Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004), page 748. Hereinafter cited as Plantagenet Ancestry.
  6. [S4] C.F.J. Hankinson, editor, DeBretts Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Companionage, 147th year (London, U.K.: Odhams Press, 1949), page 20 . Hereinafter cited as DeBretts Peerage, 1949.
  7. [S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995). Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.
  8. [S105] Brain Tompsett, Royal Genealogical Data, online http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/genealogy/royal/. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogical Data.
  9. [S1916] Tim Boyle, "re: Boyle Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 16 September 2006. Hereinafter cited as "re: Boyle Family."
  10. [S37] BP2003 See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]

Isabella de Clare, Countess of Gloucester1

F, #102007, b. before 1176, d. 14 October 1217
Last Edited=31 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.12%
     Isabella de Clare, Countess of Gloucester was born before 1176.1 She was the daughter of William fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Hawise de Beaumont.2 She married, firstly, John I 'Lackland', King of England, son of Henry II 'Curtmantle' d'Anjou, King of England and Eleanor, Duchesse d'Aquitaine, on 29 August 1189 at Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England.3 She and John I 'Lackland', King of England were divorced in 1199, on the grounds of consanguinity.3 She married, secondly, Geoffrey de Mandeville, 4th Earl of Essex, son of Geoffrey fitz Piers, 3rd Earl of Essex and Beatrice de Say, on 20 January 1214.1 She married, thirdly, Hubert de Burgh, 1st Earl of Kent, son of unknown de Burgh and Alice (?), in September 1217.1 She died on 14 October 1217.1 She was buried at Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, Kent, England.1
     She was also known as Joan de Clare.1 She was also known as Hawise de Clare.1 She was also known as Eleanor de Clare.1 She gained the title of Countess of Gloucester in 1189.2 From 20 January 1214, her married name became de Mandeville. From September 1217, her married name became de Burgh.

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 66. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogies Website.
  3. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 65.

Isabella d'Angoulême1

F, #102008, b. circa 1188, d. 31 May 1246
Last Edited=20 Apr 2014
     Isabella d'Angoulême was born circa 1188 at Angoulême, Angoumois, France.2 She was the daughter of Aymer Taillefer, Comte d'Angoulême and Alice de Courtenay.1,3 She married John I 'Lackland', King of England, son of Henry II 'Curtmantle' d'Anjou, King of England and Eleanor, Duchesse d'Aquitaine, on 24 August 1200 at Bordeaux Cathedral, Bordeaux, Dauphine, France.4 She married, secondly, Hugues X de Lusignan, Comte de La Marche, son of Hugues IX de Lusignan and Marie d'Angoulême, between March 1220 and May 1220.2 She died on 31 May 1246 at Fontevraud, France.2 She was buried at Fontevraud Abbey, Fontevraud, France.2
     As a result of her marriage, Isabella d'Angoulême was styled as Queen Consort Isabella of England on 8 October 1200.2 She succeeded to the title of Comtesse d'Angoulême in November 1202.2

Children of Isabella d'Angoulême and John I 'Lackland', King of England

Citations

  1. [S37] BP2003 volume 1, page 1122. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 67. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  3. [S37] BP2003. [S37]
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 66.
  5. [S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogies Website.
  6. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 204.

Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall1

M, #102009, b. 5 January 1209, d. 2 April 1272
Last Edited=21 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.1%
     Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall was born on 5 January 1209 at Winchester Castle, Winchester, Hampshire, England.1 He was the son of John I 'Lackland', King of England and Isabella d'Angoulême.2 He married, firstly, Lady Isabella Marshal, daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabella de Clare, Countess of Pembroke, on 30 March 1231 [13 Mar 1230/1 O.S.] at Fawley Church, Fawley, Buckinghamshire, England.3,4 He married, secondly, Sanchia of Provence, daughter of Raimond Berengar V, Comte de Provence and Beatrice di Savoia, on 23 November 1243 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England.5 He married, thirdly, Beatrix von Kleve-Valkenburg, daughter of Dietrich II von Kleve Herr von Valkenburg and Bertha van Limburg Edelfrau von Monschau, on 16 June 1269 at Kaiserslautern, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany.6 He died on 2 April 1272 at age 63 at Berkhamsted Castle, Hertfordshire, England.3 He was buried at Hayles Abbey, Gloucestershire, England.3
     He held the office of Constable of Wallingford Castle in 1216.4 He was invested as a Knight in February 1224/25.4 On 13 February 1224/25 he was granted by his brother King Henry III, the County of Cornwall during the King's pleasure, following which he was presumably invested as Earl of that county.4 He gained the title of Comte de Poitou before 14 August 1225.1 He held the office of Lieutenant of Guienne from 1226 to 1227.4 He was created 1st Earl of Cornwall [England] on 21 August 1227.4 He held the office of Ambassador to the Holy Roman Emperor in 1237, Frederick II.4 From 1240 to 1241 he went on Crusade.4 He abdicated as Count of Poitou circa December 1243.1 He held the office of Ambassador to the Pope in 1250, Innocent IV.4 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) in 1253.4 He was Co-Regent or sole Regent during his brother King Henry III's campaigns in Gascony from 1253 to 1254.4 He gained the title of King Richard of Germany on 13 January 1257.3 He gained the title of King Richard of the Romans on 13 January 1257.3 He was crowned King of the Germans (Almayne) and of the Romans on 17 May 1257 at Aachen, Germany.3,4 He was ejected as King of the Romans (three of the Electors apparently having thrown him over because his monetary inducements to them were too small) and returned to England.4 He held the office of Ambassador to the Pope in 1259, Alexander IV.4 He fought in the Battle of Lewes in 1264, against Simon de Montfort's barons, and was captured.4

Children of Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall and Beatrix von Kleve-Valkenburg

Child of Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall and Jeanne de Valletort

Children of Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall and Lady Isabella Marshal

Children of Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall and Sanchia of Provence

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 67. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S37] BP2003 See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  3. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 68.
  4. [S37] BP2003. [S37]
  5. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 69.
  6. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 70.
  7. [S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogies Website.

Joan of England1

F, #102010, b. 22 July 1210, d. 4 March 1238
Last Edited=21 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.1%

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 199. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 198.