Lilian E. Hicks1

F, #102551, b. 1874
Last Edited=11 Sep 2013
     Lilian E. Hicks was born in 1874 at North Shields, Northumberland, England.1 She was the daughter of Reverend Herbert Sawyer Hicks and Elizabeth Maria Syer.1

Citations

  1. [S4567] Bill Norton, "re: Pitman Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger LUNDY (101053), 6 April 2010 and 19 April 2011. Hereinafter cited as "re: Pitman Family."
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."

John MacDonald Bannerman, Baron Bannerman of Kildonan1

M, #102552, b. 1 September 1901, d. 10 May 1969
Last Edited=10 May 2006
     John MacDonald Bannerman, Baron Bannerman of Kildonan was born on 1 September 1901.1 He was the son of John Roderick Bannerman.1 He married Ray Mundell, daughter of W. Mundell, in 1931.1 He died on 10 May 1969 at age 67.1
     He was educated at Glasgow High School, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.1 He graduated from University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland, with a Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.).1 He graduated from Balliol College, Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, with a Master of Arts (M.A.).1 He was invested as a Officer, Order of the British Empire (O.B.E.) in 1952.1 He held the office of President of the Scottish Liberal Party in 1965.1 He was created Baron Bannerman of Kildonan, of Kildonan in the County of Stirlingshire [U.K. Life Peer] on 5 December 1967.1,2

Children of John MacDonald Bannerman, Baron Bannerman of Kildonan and Ray Mundell

Citations

  1. [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 21. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.
  2. [S134] Heraldic Media Ltd., online http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/, Patrick Cracoft-Brennan (Cracroft Peerage Database v5.2), downloaded 1 November 2006.

Gwladus Du ferch Llywelyn1

F, #102553, d. 1251
Last Edited=25 Oct 2009
     Gwladus Du ferch Llywelyn was the daughter of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, Prince of North Wales and Tangwystyl Goch. She married, firstly, Reynold de Briouze, son of William de Briouze and Maud de Saint Valéry, in 1215.1 She married, secondly, Ralph de Mortimer, son of Roger de Mortimer and Isabel de Ferrieres, after 1228.1 She died in 1251 at Windsor, Berkshire, England.1
      Gwladus Du ferch Llywelyn also went by the nick-name of Gwladus 'the Dark'.

Child of Gwladus Du ferch Llywelyn and Ralph de Mortimer

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 22. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

Reynold de Briouze1

M, #102554, b. before 1188, d. between 5 May 1227 and 9 June 1228
Last Edited=14 Dec 2013
     Reynold de Briouze was born before 1188.1 He was the son of William de Briouze and Maud de Saint Valéry.1 He married, firstly, Grecia de Briwere, daughter of William de Briwere and Beatrice de Vaux, before 1215.1 He married, secondly, Gwladus Du ferch Llywelyn, daughter of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, Prince of North Wales and Tangwystyl Goch, in 1215.1 He married Grecia de Briwere, daughter of William de Briwere and Beatrice de Vaux.2 He died between 5 May 1227 and 9 June 1228.1
     He was also known as Reginald de Braose.3 He succeeded to the title of Lord Abergavenny [Feudal] on 13 November 1215.1 On 26 May 1216 he had seizin of his father's lands. After 1220 he gave up Bramber to nephew John, son of his brother William.1

Child of Reynold de Briouze and Grecia de Briwere

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 22. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S1916] Tim Boyle, "re: Boyle Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 16 September 2006. Hereinafter cited as "re: Boyle Family."
  3. [S3945] Peter Llewelyn, "re: Mansel Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger LUNDY (101053), 31 August 2009. Hereinafter cited as "re: Mansel Family."

John Roderick Bannerman1

M, #102555
Last Edited=9 Feb 2004

Child of John Roderick Bannerman

Citations

  1. [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 21. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.


Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley of Norragh1

M, #102556, b. 20 June 1760, d. 26 September 1842
Last Edited=7 Jul 2012
Consanguinity Index=0.0%
Richard Wellesley, 2nd Earl of Mornington
by William Martin Archer Shee, 1832 2
     Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley of Norragh was born on 20 June 1760 at Dangan Castle, County Meath, Ireland.1 He was the son of Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington and Hon. Anne Hill. He married, firstly, Hyacinthe Gabrielle Roland, daughter of Pierre Roland and Hyacinthe Gabrielle Varis, on 29 November 1794 at St. George's Church, St. George Street, Hanover Square, London, England.3 He married, secondly, Marianne Caton, daughter of Richard Caton and Mary Carroll, on 29 October 1825 at Vice Regal Lodge, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland.3 He died on 26 September 1842 at age 82 at Kingston House, Knightsbridge, London, England.3 He was buried on 8 October 1842 at Chapel, Eton College, Windsor, Berkshire, England.3
     He was given the name of Richard Wesley at birth.1 He was styled as Viscount Wellesley between 1761 and 1781.1 He was educated in 1770 at Harrow School, Harrow on the Hill, London, England, where he was expelled for his share in the 'baring out' which took place on the appointment of Dr. Heath as headmaster.1 He was educated between 1772 and 1777 at Eton College, Windsor, Berkshire, England.1 He was educated in 1778 at Christ Church, Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.1 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Trim between 1780 and 1781.1 He held the office of Custos Rotulorum of County Meath between 1781 and 1842.1 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Baron of Mornington [I., 1746] on 22 May 1781.3 He succeeded to the title of 2nd Earl of Mornington [I., 1760] on 22 May 1781.1 He succeeded to the title of 2nd Viscount Wellesley of Dangan Castle [I., 1760] on 22 May 1781. He was invested as a Knight, Order of St. Patrick (K.P.) on 11 March 1783.1 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Beeralston between 1784 and 1786.1 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) [Ireland] on 24 February 1784.1 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Saltash between 1786 and 1787.1 He held the office of a Lord of the Treasury between 1786 and 1797.1 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Windsor between 1787 and 1796.1 In 1789 his name was legally changed to Richard Wellesley.1 He held the office of a Commissioner for Indian Affairs between 1793 and 1797.4 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) on 21 June 1793.1 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Old Sarum between 1796 and 1797.1 He held the office of Governor-General of Bengal between 1797 and 1805. During this period, he effected the capture of Seringaputam and the complete destruction of Mysore.4 He held the office of Governor of Madras in May 1797.4 He was created 1st Baron Wellesley of Wellesley [Great Britain] on 20 October 1797.4 He held the office of Chief Remembrancer of the Court of Exchequer [Ireland] in 1798.4 He was created 1st Marquess Wellesley of Norragh [Ireland] on 2 December 1799.1 In 1800 , he declined the star and badge of the Order of St. Patrick, made from the jewels of Tipoo Sahib, offered to him by the army (he was afraid it might diminsh the prize money he was due).4 He was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws (LL.D.) by University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland, in 1804.4 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Crescent of Turkey on 19 November 1805.4 He held the office of Ambassador to the Centra Junta of Spain in 1809.4 He held the office of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs between December 1809 and March 1812.4 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) on 3 March 1810.4 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Lion and Sun of Persia on 29 July 1812.4 He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland between 1821 and 1828, Viceroy.4 He held the office of Lord Steward of the Household between 1830 and 1833.4 He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland between 1833 and 1834, Viceroy.4 He held the office of Lord Chamberlain of the Household between April 1835 and May 1835.4
     In May 1799 he wrote privately to Lord Grenville: "To talk like Lord Abercorn-you will gain much credit by conferring some high and brilliant honour upon me immediately. The Garter would be much more acceptable to me than any additional title, nor would any title be an object, which should not raise me to the same rank which was given to Lord Cornwallis." He was greatly vexed at not obtaining a Marquessate of Great Britain like his predecessor, Lord Cornwallis, but it was explained to him that the latter was promoted from an Earldom of Great Britain, while in his case the Earldom was of Ireland. On his retirement from public life he sought further promotion. Lord Broughton records him saying to him: "you got £20,000 for me from the Court of Directors; you ought now to get a dukedom for me from the Queen."4 In late life he used to wear his garter, star and ribbon over his dressing gown. Farington writes "Laurence spoke of Lord Wellesley as having ruined His fortune by His excessive expenses on Women. With all his abilities He has so great a share of vanity that at the age of about 53 Laurence has noticed, when His Lordship sat to him for His Portrait, that his Lips were painted."3 Lord Macauley writes of him in June 1813, "he has made a great and splendid figure in history, and his weaknesses, though they make his character less worthy of respect, make it more interesting as a study."3 P.E. Roberts writes in 1929 that while no doubt his dispatches from India were pompous and inflated, but "they were massivley impressive in their power, their logical force, and their tone of decision... He was an administrator and ruler of wonderful achievement, and glorious capacity."3

Children of Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley of Norragh and Hyacinthe Gabrielle Roland

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IX, page 236. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 238.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 237.
  5. [S9] Charles Kidd and David Williamson, editor, DeBretts Peerage and Baronetage (London, U.K.: DeBrett's Peerage, 1999), volume 2, page 2972. Hereinafter cited as DeBretts Peerage, 1999.
  6. [S15] George Edward Cokayne, editor, The Complete Baronetage, 5 volumes (no date (c. 1900); reprint, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1983), volume II, page 100. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Baronetage.

Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington1

M, #102557, b. 19 July 1735, d. 22 May 1781
Last Edited=17 Dec 2012
     Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington was born on 19 July 1735.2 He was the son of Richard Wesley, 1st Baron of Mornington and Elizabeth Sale.2 He was baptised on 10 August 1735 at St. Andrew's Church, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland.2 He married Hon. Anne Hill, daughter of Arthur Hill-Trevor, 1st Viscount of Dungannon and Anne Stafford, on 6 February 1759.2 He died on 22 May 1781 at age 45 at Kensington, London, England.2 He was buried at Grosvenor Chapel, South Audley Street, Mayfair, London, England.2
     He was educated between 1751 and 1764 at Trinity College, Dublin University, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland.2 He graduated from Trinity College, Dublin University, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland, in 1754 with a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.).2 He graduated from Trinity College, Dublin University, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland, in 1757 with a Master of Arts (M.A.).2 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Trim between 1757 and 1758.2 He succeeded to the title of 2nd Baron of Mornington [I., 1746] on 31 January 1758.2 He held the office of Custos Rotulorum of County Meath in 1759.2 He was created 1st Viscount Wellesley of Dangan Castle [Ireland] on 2 October 1760. He is said to have owed his Earldom to very considerable musical talent which had gained him the favour of King George III. Some of his compositions, glees and double-chants are still sung and admired.2 He was created 1st Earl of Mornington [Ireland] on 2 October 1760.1 He graduated from Trinity College, Dublin University, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland, in 1764 with a Doctor of Music.2 He was a professor of Music between July 1764 and June 1774 at Trinity College, Dublin University, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland.2 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) [Ireland] on 24 September 1776.2 In 1748 Mrs. Delany writes of him "my godson, Master Wesley, is a most extraordinary boy... he is a very good scholar, and whatever study he undertakes he masters most surprisingly. He began with the fiddle last year, he now plays everything at sight; he understands fortification, building of ships, and has more knowledge than I ever met with in one so young."3

Children of Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington and Hon. Anne Hill

Citations

  1. [S4] C.F.J. Hankinson, editor, DeBretts Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Companionage, 147th year (London, U.K.: Odhams Press, 1949), page 1100. Hereinafter cited as DeBretts Peerage, 1949.
  2. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IX, page 235. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 236.
  4. [S9] Charles Kidd and David Williamson, editor, DeBretts Peerage and Baronetage (London, U.K.: DeBrett's Peerage, 1999), volume 2, page 2973. Hereinafter cited as DeBretts Peerage, 1999.
  5. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 239.
  6. [S9] Kidd and Williamson, DeBretts Peerage, 1999, volume 2, page 2972.
  7. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 479.

Hon. Anne Hill1

F, #102558, b. 23 June 1742, d. 10 September 1831
Last Edited=13 Mar 2011
Anne, Countess of Mornington
by Thomas Lawrence, 1820 2
     Hon. Anne Hill was born on 23 June 1742.3 She was the daughter of Arthur Hill-Trevor, 1st Viscount of Dungannon and Anne Stafford.1,3 She married Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington, son of Richard Wesley, 1st Baron of Mornington and Elizabeth Sale, on 6 February 1759.4 She died on 10 September 1831 at age 89 at Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, London, England.3 She was buried at Grosvenor Chapel, South Audley Street, Mayfair, London, England.3
      On 1 October 1758 , Mrs. Delany writes of her as 'a fine young woman altogether; rather a little clumsy, but fine complexion, teeth and nails, with a good deal of modesty and good-humour.3' From 6 February 1759, her married name became Wesley. As a result of her marriage, Hon. Anne Hill was styled as Countess of Mornington on 2 October 1760.

Children of Hon. Anne Hill and Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington

Citations

  1. [S37] BP2003 volume 1, page 1176. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  3. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IX, page 236. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 235.
  5. [S9] Charles Kidd and David Williamson, editor, DeBretts Peerage and Baronetage (London, U.K.: DeBrett's Peerage, 1999), volume 2, page 2973. Hereinafter cited as DeBretts Peerage, 1999.
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 239.
  7. [S9] Kidd and Williamson, DeBretts Peerage, 1999, volume 2, page 2972.
  8. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 479.

Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington1

M, #102559, b. 1 May 1769, d. 14 September 1852
Last Edited=8 May 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.0%
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
By Francisco de Goya2
     Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington was born on 1 May 1769 at Mornington House, 24 Upper Merrion Street, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland.4 He was the son of Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington and Hon. Anne Hill. He was baptised at St. Peter's Church, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland.4 He married Hon. Catherine Sarah Dorothea Pakenham, daughter of Edward Michael Pakenham, 2nd Baron Longford and Catherine Rowley, on 10 April 1806 at St. George's Church, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland.5 He died on 14 September 1852 at age 83 at Walmer Castle, Walmer, Kent, England.5 He was buried on 18 November 1852 at St. Paul's Cathedral, The City, London, England.1
     He was given the name of Arthur Wesley at birth.6 He was educated at Brown's Seminary, King's Road, Chelsea, London, England.4 He was educated between 1781 and 1784 at Eton College, Windsor, Berkshire, England.4 He was educated between 1785 and 1786 at Brussels, Belgium.4 He was educated between 1785 and 1786 at the Academy, Angers, Anjou, France.4 He gained the rank of Ensign on 7 March 1787 in the service of the 73rd Regiment of Foot.4 He held the office of Aide-de-Camp to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland between November 1787 and March 1793, two successive Lord-Lieutenants.4 He gained the rank of Lieutenant on 25 December 1787 in the service of the 76th Regiment of Foot.4 He gained the rank of Lieutenant on 23 January 1788 in the service of the 41st Regiment of Foot.4 He gained the rank of Lieutenant on 25 June 1789 in the service of the 12th Light Dragoons.4 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Independent) for Trim between 1790 and 1797.4 He gained the rank of Captain on 30 June 1791 in the service of the 58th Regiment of Foot.4 He gained the rank of Captain on 31 October 1792 in the service of the 18th Light Dragoons.4 He gained the rank of Major on 30 April 1793 in the service of the 33rd Regiment of Foot.4 He gained the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel on 30 September 1793 in the service of the 33rd Regiment of Foot.4 He fought in the campaign in Holland between 1794 and 1795, and was present at the affair of Boxtel.4 He gained the rank of Colonel on 3 May 1796 in the service of the British Army.4 He fought in the wars in India between 1797 and 1805, including the campaign against Tippoo Sahib.4 In March 1798 his name was legally changed to Arthur Wellesley.6 He held the office of Governor of Seringapatam and Mysore between 1799 and 1805.4 He gained the rank of Major-General on 29 April 1802 in the service of the British Army.4 He fought in the Battle of Assaye on 23 September 1803, where he defeated 40,000 men with 7,000 troops.4 He fought in the Battle of Argaum on 29 November 1803 at Argaum, India.4 He fought in the storming of the fortress of Gawilghur on 5 December 1803, ending in the submission of Scindia and the Rajah of Berah.4 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Bath (K.B.) on 28 August 1804 for his victories in India.4 He fought in the abortive expedition to Hanover between December 1805 and February 1806.4 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Tory) for Rye between April 1806 and October 1806.4 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Tory) for Newport, Isle of Wight between 1807 and 1809.4 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Tory) for St. Michael between January 1807 and April 1807.4 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) on 8 April 1807.4 He held the office of Lord of the Treasury [Ireland] between May 1807 and April 1809.7 He gained the rank of Lieutenant-General on 2 April 1808 in the service of the British Army.7 He gained the rank of chief command in June 1808 in the service of the in the Peninsula.7 He gained the rank of Commander-in-Chief on 6 July 1808 in the service of the Portuguese Army.7 He fought in the Battle of Roliça on 17 August 1808.7 He fought in the Battle of Vimeiro on 21 August 1808.7 He gained the rank of Commander-in-Chief in April 1809 in the service of the British forces in Portugal.7 He fought in the forcing of a passage over the Douro on 12 May 1809 at Portugal.7 He fought in the Battle of Talavera on 27 July 1809.7 He gained the rank of Captain-General in August 1809 in the service of the Spanish Army.7 He was created 1st Viscount Wellington of Talavera and of Wellington [U.K.] on 4 September 1809.7 He was created 1st Baron Douro of Wellesley [U.K.] on 4 September 1809.7 He fought in the Battle of Busaco on 27 September 1810, defeating Marshal Massena.7 He fought in the invasion of Portugal in March 1811, by extending the fortications of Torres Vedras, he prevented the French from getting to Lisbon, forcing them to retreat back into Spain.8 He fought in the Battle of Fuentes de Oñoro on 5 May 1811 at Fuentes de Oñoro, Spain.8 He gained the rank of General on 31 July 1811 in the service of the British Army.8 He was created 1st Conde de Vimeiro [Portugual] on 18 October 1811.8 He was created 1st Duque de Ciudad Rodrigo [Spain] in January 1812.8 He was created 1st Earl of Wellington [U.K.] on 28 February 1812.8 He fought in the Siege of Badajoz on 6 April 1812 at Badajoz, Spain.8 He fought in the Battle of Salamanca on 22 July 1812, defeating Marmont. "For Goya watched him, as he rode in that night from Salamanca ... and [his] strange drawing ... records the exhausted victor - unshaven, hollow-eyed, the damp hair plastered to his forehead, a little shaken by the spent bullet which had bruised his thigh."8 He was created 1st Marquis of Torres Vedras [Portugual] in August 1812.1 He fought in the capture of Madrid on 12 August 1812 at Madrid, Spain.8 He gained the rank of Generalissmo in September 1812 in the service of the Armies of Spain.8 He was created 1st Marquess of Wellington [U.K.] on 3 October 1812. He was also granted £100,000 for the purchase of lands to descend with the peerage.8 He was created 1st Duque de Victoria [Portugual] on 18 December 1812.8 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) on 4 March 1813.8 He gained the rank of Field Marshal on 21 June 1813 in the service of the British Army.8 He fought in the Battle of Vitoria on 21 June 1813, where he defeated Marshal Jourdan.8 He fought in the capture of San Sebastian on 31 August 1813 at San Sebastián, Spain.8 He fought in the capture of Pampeluna on 31 October 1813 at Pampeluna, Spain.8 He fought in the Battle of Nivelle on 10 November 1813 at Nivelle, France.8 He fought in the Battle of Orthez on 27 February 1814 at Orthez, France.8 He fought in the Battle of Toulouse on 10 April 1814 at Toulouse, France, where he finally defeated Marshall Soult.8 He was created 1st Marquess of Douro [U.K.] on 11 May 1814.8 He was created 1st Duke of Wellington [U.K.] on 11 May 1814. He received an additional £400,000 to buy estates entailed on the male heirs of his family, failing which on the female heirs.8 He was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Civil Laws (D.C.L.), by diploma by Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, on 14 June 1814.8 He held the office of Ambassador Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to France between August 1814 and January 1815.8 He was First Plenipotentiary to the Congress of Vienna between January 1815 and March 1815 at Vienna, Austria.8 He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Order of the Bath (G.C.B.) on 2 January 1815.4 He gained the rank of Field Marshal in February 1815 in the service of the Hanover Army.8 He was Commander-in-Chief of the Allied Forces on the Continent on 28 March 1815.8 He held the office of Joint Plenipotentiary to treat for peace with France between June 1815 and November 1815.9 He fought in the Battle of Quatre Bras on 16 June 1815 at Quatre-Bras, Belgium.9 He fought in the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815 at Waterloo, Belgium, where he finally defeated Napoleon.9 He was created 1st Prince of Waterloo [Netherlands] on 18 July 1815.9 He was Commander-in-Chief of the Allied Armies in Occupation in France between October 1815 and November 1818.9 He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Hanoverian Order (G.C.H.) in March 1816.9 He held the office of Master-General of the Ordnance between 1818 and 1827.9 He was Joint Plenipotentiary to the Conference of Aix-la-Chapelle between August 1818 and November 1818 at Aachen, Germany.9 He held the office of Governor of Plymouth between 1819 and 1826.9 He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Hampshire between 1820 and 1852.9 He was Plenipotentiary to the Conference of Verona between September 1822 and November 1822 at Verona, Italy.9 He held the office of Constable of the Tower of London between 1826 and 1852.9 He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of the Tower Hamlets between 1826 and 1852. He held the office of Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury between January 1828 and November 1830.9 He held the office of Constable of Dover Castle between 1829 and 1852.9 He held the office of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports between 1829 and 1852. On 21 March 1829 at Battersea Park, Battersea, London, England, he fought a bloodless duel with the Earl of Winchilsea, as a result of the Roman Catholic Relief Bill passed in his government.9 He held the office of Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury between November 1834 and December 1834.9 He held the office of Secretary of State for the Home, Foreign and Colonial Departments between November 1834 and December 1834. He held the office of Foreign Secretary between December 1834 and April 1835.9 He was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws (LL.D.) by Cambridge University, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, on 6 July 1835.9 He held the office of Cabinet Minister without office between 1841 and 1846.9 He was Commander-in-Chief of the Forces between 1842 and 1852.9 He was invested as a Fellow, Royal Society (F.R.S.) on 25 November 1847.9 He held the office of Ranger of St. James's Park and Hyde Park between 1850 and 1852.9 Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington also went by the nick-name of 'The Iron Duke'.
     The Earl of Mulgrave says of him "there is no part of his great character more amiable or more rare than his temper and fortitude under great disappointments arising from the weakness or neglect of others."10 Fortescue writes "it is much to be a great general and a great ruler of men; it is more also to be a great gentleman and a great patriot. It is more than all to exalt for ever in a great nation the standard of discipline and of duty. And this was the mightiest work of Wellington."10 The future Duke himself wrote in 1806 'I am nimmukwallah, as we say in the East; that is, I have ate of the King's salt and, therefore, I conceive it to be my duty to serve with unhesitating zeal and cheerfulness, when and wherever the King or his government may think proper to employ me.10' Raikes describes him in 1843 as "remarkably neat in his appearance, always wearing a white coat and trowsers ... and a blue riding coat in the morning ... he is la vielle cour personifiée.10" Fortescue writes that "in person he was not comely; but his features, with the wavy black hair, fine blue eyes rather deeply sunk, auiline nose, immensely strong jaw and pointed chin, indicated above all things, character. The mouth was rather disproportionately small ... it was not a kind or sympathetic mouth. His voice has been handed down by tradition as deep, gruff and rather thick ... He was five feet nine inches in height, spare, muscular, very well made ... His feet were small; and his hands, with slender taper fingers, the hands of an artist. In old age he became bowed, and very thin, but never wholly lost his white hair. He was scrupulously neat and smart in his dress, for, having a good figure, he was not above making the best of it; and one of his nicknames was the Beau.10"

Children of Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington and Hon. Catherine Sarah Dorothea Pakenham

Citations

  1. [S4] C.F.J. Hankinson, editor, DeBretts Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Companionage, 147th year (London, U.K.: Odhams Press, 1949), page 1100. Hereinafter cited as DeBretts Peerage, 1949.
  2. [S1710] Juan Carlos Marino y Montero, "re: Sapieha-Potocki Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 4 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as "re: Sapieha-Potocki Family."
  3. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  4. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, page 452. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  5. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 456.
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 451.
  7. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 453.
  8. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 454.
  9. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 455.
  10. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 457.

Arthur Hill-Trevor, 1st Viscount of Dungannon1

M, #102560, d. 30 January 1771
Last Edited=13 Dec 2012
     Arthur Hill-Trevor, 1st Viscount of Dungannon was the son of Rt. Hon. Michael Hill and Anne Trevor.2 He and Anne Deane obtained a marriage license on 9 February 1724.2,3 He married, secondly, Anne Stafford, daughter of Edmund Francis Stafford, on 12 January 1737.4,5 He died on 30 January 1771.2
     He was given the name of Arthur Hill at birth.2 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Hillsborough between 1715 and 1727.2 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for County Down between 1727 and 1765.2 He held the office of Sheriff of County Down in 1736.2 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) [Ireland] in 1750.2 He held the office of Chancellor of the Exchequer [Ireland] from 1754 to 1755.2 He held the office of Commissioner of Revenue [Ireland] between 1755 and 1771.2 In January 1759 his name was legally changed to Arthur Hill-Trevor by Act of Parliament.2 He was created 1st Viscount of Dungannon [Ireland] on 17 February 1766.2 He was created 1st Baron Hill of Olderfleet, of Belvior, co. Down and Brynkinalt [Ireland] on 17 February 1766.2

Children of Arthur Hill-Trevor, 1st Viscount of Dungannon and Anne Stafford

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, page 452. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S37] BP2003 volume 1, page 1176. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  3. [S142] Bernard, Sir Burke, editor, Burke's genealogical and heraldic history of the landed gentry of Ireland, 3rd ed. (London, U.K.: Burkes Peerage Ltd, 1912), page 169. Hereinafter cited as Landed Gentry of Ireland.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 236.
  5. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IV, page 537.