Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick1

M, #101631, b. 22 November 1428, d. 14 April 1471
Last Edited=15 Oct 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.42%
     Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick was born on 22 November 1428.1 He was the son of Richard de Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury and Alice Montagu, Countess of Salisbury.1 He married Lady Anne Beauchamp, daughter of Richard Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick and Isabel le Despenser, in 1434.2 He died on 14 April 1471 at age 42, killed in action, without male issue.2 He was buried at Bisham Abbey, Berkshire, England.
      Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick also went by the nick-name of 'The Kingmaker'. He was invested as a Knight before 6 August 1445.1 He held the office of Joint Warden of Carlisle and the West Marches towards Scotland in 1446.1 He succeeded to the title of 16th Earl of Warwick on 23 July 1449.1 He held the office of Hereditary Chamberlain of the Exchequer in 1450, in right of his wife.1 He held the office of Hereditary Sheriff of Worcestershire between 1450 and 1470.1 He was created 1st Earl of Warwick [England] on 2 March 1449/50.1 He held the office of Joint Warden of Carlisle and the West Marches towards Scotland in 1453.1 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) before 6 December 1453.1 He held the office of Captain of Calais in 1455.1 He fought in the First Battle of St. Albans on 22 May 1455, commander of the Yorks.1 He fought in the naval actions against the Spaniards and Hanseatic traders from 1458 to 1459, as naval commander.1 On 20 November 1459 he was attainted.1 He held the office of Governor of the Channel Islands in 1460.1 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) in 1460.1 He fought in the Battle of Northampton on 10 July 1460, where he lead the Yorkists to victory.1 In October 1460 he was pardoned.1 He held the office of Constable of Dover Castle in 1461.1 He held the office of Warden of the Cinque Ports in 1461.1 He held the office of Lord Great Chamberlain [England] in January 1460/61.1 He fought in the Second Battle of St. Albans on 17 February 1460/61, where he lead the Yorkists to defeat.1 He fought in the Battle of Towton on 29 March 1461, where he commanded the central block of the Yorkist army.1 He held the office of Lord Great Chamberlain in May 1461, for life.1 He held the office of Warden of the East and West Marches towards Scotland in July 1461.1 He held the office of Lord High Steward [England] in December 1461.1 He held the office of Admiral of England in 1462.1 He succeeded to the title of 6th Earl of Salisbury in 1462.1 In 1469 he suppressed the Lancastrian rising in the North, under his relative Sir Humphrey Neville.1 In September 1470 he proclaimed Henry as king, after switching support from King Edward IV to Henry (VI).1 He held the office of Joint Lord of the Realm in November 1470.1 He held the office of Admiral of England, Ireland and Acquitaine in January 1470/71.2 He fought in the Battle of Barnet on 14 April 1471.
     On his death, the Earldom of Salisbury reverted to the Crown.

Children of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick and Lady Anne Beauchamp

Citations

  1. [S8] BP1999 volume 1, page 15. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S8]
  2. [S8] BP1999. [S8]

Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York1

M, #101632, b. 21 September 1411, d. 30 December 1460
Last Edited=22 Mar 2007
Consanguinity Index=2.37%
     Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York was born on 21 September 1411.2 He was the son of Richard of York, 1st Earl of Cambridge and Lady Anne de Mortimer.3 He married Lady Cecily Neville, daughter of Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland and Lady Joan de Beaufort, before 18 October 1424.4 He died on 30 December 1460 at age 49 at Wakefield, Yorkshire, England, killed in action.5 He was buried on 30 July 1476 at Collegiate Church of Fotheringhay, Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, England. He was buried at Pontefract Castle, Pontefract, Yorkshire, West Riding, England.5
     He was also known as Richard of York.2 He succeeded to the title of Lord Mortimer of Wigmore on 18 January 1424/25.6 He succeeded to the title of 6th Earl of March on 18 January 1424/25.6 He succeeded to the title of Earl of Ulster on 18 January 1424/25.6 He succeeded to the title of 16th Lord of Clare [feudal baron] on 19 January 1424/25.7 He was invested as a Knight on 19 May 1426.6 He succeeded to the title of 2nd Earl of Cambridge [E., 1414] on 19 May 1426.3 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Duke of York [E., 1385] on 19 May 1426, being restored in blood to the honours held by his uncle.2 He held the office of Constable of England on 20 January 1429/30.6 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) on 22 April 1433.6 He fought in the Battle of Fécamp in 1436.6 He was Chief Commissioner to treat with France on 20 May 1436.8 He held the office of Lieutenant-General and Governor of France and Normandy in 1436/37.6 He fought in the storming of Pontoise in February 1436/37.6 He was Chief Commissioner to treat with France on 9 September 1442.8 He abdicated as Earl of March between September 1445 and December 1445.8 He held the office of Justice in Eyre of all Forests South of Trent between 14 July 1447 and July 1453.8 He held the office of Lieutenant of Ireland between 9 December 1447 and March 1453.8 In 1448 his name was legally changed to Richard Plantagenet.4 He held the office of Constable of Rockingham Castle on 21 March 1451. He held the office of Steward and Warden of Rockingham Forest on 21 March 1450/51.8 He held the office of Protector of the Realm between 3 April 1454 and February 1455.8 He held the office of Keeper of the King's Mines in Devon and Cornwall on 19 July 1454.8 He held the office of Captain of Calais between 28 July 1454 and 6 March 1455, and Lieutenant in the Matches there.8 He held the office of Lieutenant of Ireland between 1 December 1454 and 1459.8 He fought in the First Battle of St. Albans on 22 May 1455, where York defeated his rival, Somerset, and the King was taken prisoner.8 He held the office of Constable of Cararthen and Aberystwyth Castles, and of Careg Cennen Castle between 2 June 1455 and April 1457.8 He held the office of Protector of the Realm between 19 November 1455 and 25 February 1456.8 On 20 November 1459 he was attainted, and all his honours and titles were declared forfeit. He was restored to his titles and honours in October 1460.5 In September 1460 the attainder of the Coventry Parliament of 1459 was annulled, and so he was restored to his titles and estates. He claimed the right to the crown of England, however, this claim was not well recevied, and he had to be satisfied with a compromise, where he as declared heir after the demise of king Henry VI, with remainder to his own heirs.9 He was created Duke of Cornwall on 31 October 1460.9 He was created Prince Richard of Wales on 31 October 1460.9 On 9 November 1460 he was publically proclaimed as heir to King Henry VI, and was directed by the King to suppress all rebellions in England and Wales.9 He fought in the Battle of Wakefield on 30 December 1460 at Wakefield, Yorkshire, England, where he met Queen Margaret and the Lancastrians, and his army was routed.5

Children of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York and Lady Cecily Neville

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), Volume 12, page 905. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, Volume XII/2, page 905.
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 495.
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 132. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  5. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 134.
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, Volume XII/2, page 906.
  7. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 246.
  8. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 907.
  9. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 908.
  10. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 260.

Lady Cecily Neville1

F, #101633, b. 3 May 1415, d. 31 May 1495
Last Edited=18 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.03%
     Lady Cecily Neville was born on 3 May 1415 at Raby Castle, Durham, County Durham, England.2 She was the daughter of Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland and Lady Joan de Beaufort.3 She married Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, son of Richard of York, 1st Earl of Cambridge and Lady Anne de Mortimer, before 18 October 1424.4 She died on 31 May 1495 at age 80 at Berkhamsted Castle, Hertfordshire, England.5 She was buried at Collegiate Church of Fotheringhay, Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, England.2
     As a result of her marriage, Lady Cecily Neville was styled as Duchess of York before 18 October 1424. From before 18 October 1424, her married name became Plantagenet. She was a nun after 1456.

Children of Lady Cecily Neville and Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, page 908. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 134. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  3. [S8] BP1999 volume 1, page 17. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S8]
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 132.
  5. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 909.
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 260.

Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland1

M, #101634, b. circa 1364, d. 21 October 1425
Last Edited=27 Jan 2013
Consanguinity Index=0.26%
     Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland was born circa 1364 at Raby Castle, Durham, County Durham, England.2,3 He was the son of John de Neville, 3rd Lord Neville and Maud de Percy.4 He married by contract, firstly, Lady Margaret de Stafford, daughter of Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford and Philippa Beauchamp, before 1370.4 He married Lady Margaret de Stafford, daughter of Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford and Philippa Beauchamp, circa 1382 at Stafford, Staffordshire, England.3 He married, secondly, Lady Joan de Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and Katherine Roët, before 29 November 1396 at Château de Beaufort, Maine-et-Loire, Anjou, France.5,3 He died on 21 October 1425 at Raby Castle, Durham, County Durham, England.6 He was buried at Staindrop, County Durham, England.6 He was buried in October 1425 at Staindrop, County Durham, England.3 His will (dated 18 October 1424) was probated.6
      In 1380 he took part in the Earl of Buckingham's expedition to Brittany.2 He was invested as a Knight in July 1380.7,2 He held the office of Joint Keeper of the castle and city of Carlisle on 26 October 1385.4,2 He held the office of Joint Warden of the West Marches towards Scotland on 27 March 1386.4,2 He succeeded to the title of 4th Lord Neville, of Raby [E., 1295] on 17 October 1388. He held the office of Joint Surveyor of the Fortifications in the Marches on 25 October 1388.2 He held the office of Joint Warden of the West Marches towards Scotland in 1389.4 He held the office of Keeper of the Forests beyond the Trent between 1389 and 1425.4 He was Chief Commissioner to perform the duties of the Constable of England in 1391.4 He held the office of Keeper of Wark Castle between February 1396/97 and September 1398.8 He held the office of Constable of the Tower of London between 21 September 1397 and 30 October 1397.4 He gained the title of 1st Earl of Westmorland [England] on 29 September 1397, for loyalty to King Richard II when the later struck back at the Lords Appellant who in 1387 had engineered convictions for treason against King Richard's friends.4 He held the office of Guardian of the truce in the East March on 28 November 1398.8 He held the office of Marshal of England between 1399 and 1413.4 In July 1399 when he sided with his brother-in-law, the banished Duke of Hereford, against King Richard II, after the Duke (later King Henry IV) returned to England.4 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) before 4 December 1399.4 He was Commissioner to treat with the Romans for the marriage of Princess Blanche on 13 February 1400/1.9 He held the office of Keeper of Roxburghe Castle between March 1401/2 and 1408.4 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) circa 1403.4 He held the office of Warden of Berwick and the Eastern March in 1403.4 He held the office of Warden of Carlisle and the Western March between 1403 and 1414.4 On 29 May 1405 at Shipton Moor, Yorkshire, England, he intercepted the rebellious Archbishop Scrope and the young Lord Mowbray, where, after a friendly conference, he arrested them in an unscrupulous manner.9 He was a member of the Council of Regency in 1415, during King Henry V's absence abroad.4 He was a member of the Council of Regency in 1422, during the minority of King Henry VI.4
     He was survived by most of his 23 children! He was a great church builder, 'curious flat headed windows being peculiar to the churches on the Nevill manors'. When he died, he left money to complete the College of Staindrop which he founded near Raby, and was buried at Staindrop, where his alabaster effigy in armour between his two wives 'remains the finest sepulchral monument in the north of England.'

Children of Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland and Lady Margaret de Stafford

Children of Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland and Lady Joan de Beaufort

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, page 908. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 544.
  3. [S125] Richard Glanville-Brown, online <e-mail address>, Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.
  4. [S8] BP1999 volume 1, page 14. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S8]
  5. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 108. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 547.
  7. [S8] BP1999. [S8]
  8. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 545.
  9. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 546.
  10. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 152.
  11. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 504.
  12. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 109.

Edward IV Plantagenet, King of England

M, #101635, b. 28 April 1442, d. 9 April 1483
Last Edited=8 Dec 2011
Consanguinity Index=2.36%
Edward IV, King of England 1
     Edward IV Plantagenet, King of England was born on 28 April 1442 at Rouen, Caux, France.2 He was the son of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York and Lady Cecily Neville. He was baptised at Rouen Cathedral, Rouen, Caux, France. He married Elizabeth Wydevill, daughter of Richard Wydevill, 1st Earl Rivers and Jacquetta de Luxembourg, on 1 May 1464 at Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire, England.3 He died on 9 April 1483 at age 40 at Palace of Westminster, Westminster, London, England.4 He was buried at St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.
     He succeeded to the title of Earl of March between 21 September 1445 and 22 December 1445.2 In 1448 his name was legally changed to Edward Plantagenet.2 He fought in the First Battle of St. Albans on 22 May 1455.2 He held the office of Constable of Bristol Castle on 14 November 1460.2 He succeeded to the title of 4th Duke of York [E., 1385] on 30 December 1460.2 He succeeded to the title of Earl of Ulster on 30 December 1460.5 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Earl of Cambridge [E., 1414] on 30 December 1460.6 He succeeded to the title of 17th Lord of Clare [feudal baron] on 31 December 1460.7 He fought in the Battle of Mortimer's Cross on 2 February 1460/61 at Wigmore, Herefordshire, England, where he utterly defeated Earls of Pembroke and Wiltshire.8 He gained the title of King Edward IV of England on 4 March 1461.9 He was crowned King of England on 28 June 1461 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England, and styled 'Rex Angliae et Franciae et Dominus Hiberniae.9' He was deposed as King of England on 3 October 1470.5 He gained the title of King Edward IV of England on 11 April 1471.5 His marriage to Elizabeth Wydevill was annulled on 25 June 1483 by an Act of Parliament, known as the 'Titulus Regius', because of King Edward's alleged precontract to Eleanor Butler. The marriage was ultimately recognised as valid in October 1485 by the first Act of Parliament of King Henry VII.3 He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.10
     

Children of Edward IV Plantagenet, King of England and Elizabeth Waite

Children of Edward IV Plantagenet, King of England and Elizabeth Wydevill

Child of Edward IV Plantagenet, King of England and Eleanor Talbot

Child of Edward IV Plantagenet, King of England

Citations

  1. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  2. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, page 909. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  3. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 138. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 141.
  5. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 137.
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 495.
  7. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 246.
  8. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 910.
  9. [S4] C.F.J. Hankinson, editor, DeBretts Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Companionage, 147th year (London, U.K.: Odhams Press, 1949), page 20 . Hereinafter cited as DeBretts Peerage, 1949.
  10. [S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995), reference "Edward IV, 1442-1483". Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.
  11. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume X, page 34.
  12. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 852.


Edmund Plantagenet, Earl of Rutland

M, #101636, b. 27 May 1443, d. 30 December 1460
Last Edited=22 May 2004
Consanguinity Index=2.36%
     Edmund Plantagenet, Earl of Rutland was born on 27 May 1443 at Rouen, Caux, France.1 He was also reported to have been born on 17 May 1443 at Rouen, Caux, France. He was the son of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York and Lady Cecily Neville. He died on 30 December 1460 at age 17 at Wakefield, Yorkshire, England, killed in action by Lord Clifford while escaping the field.2 He was buried at Pontefract Castle, Pontefract, Yorkshire, West Riding, England.1 He was buried at Collegiate Church of Fotheringhay, Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, England.1
     He gained the title of Earl of Rutland on 29 January 1446.1 In 1459 he was attainted by Act of Parliament, but was restored to his title in October 1460.1 He fought in the Battle of Wakefield on 30 December 1460 at Wakefield, Yorkshire, England.1

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 134. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, page 908. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

Sir George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence1

M, #101637, b. 21 October 1449, d. 18 February 1477/78
Last Edited=5 May 2007
Consanguinity Index=2.36%
     Sir George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence was born on 21 October 1449 at Dublin Castle, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland.2 He was the son of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York and Lady Cecily Neville.3 He was baptised at Church of St. Saviour, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland.3 He married Lady Isabel Neville, daughter of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick and Lady Anne Beauchamp, on 11 July 1469 at Church of our Lady, Calais, France.2 He died on 18 February 1477/78 at age 28 at Tower of London, The City, London, England, executed. Tradition has it he was drowned in a butt of Malmsey wine.2 He was buried at Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.2
     He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) in 1461.2 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Bath (K.B.) on 27 June 1461.2 He was created 1st Duke of Clarence [England] on 28 June 1461.2 He held the office of Chief Governor of Ireland from February 1461/62 to March 1469/70.3 He initially joined his father-in-law Warwick in the attempt to restore King Henry VI and depose his brother King Edward IV but then deserted the former for the latter at the Battle of Barnet.1 He fought in the Battle of Barnet on 14 April 1471, assisting in the King's victory.3 He held the office of Chief Governor of Ireland in 1472.3 He was created 1st Earl of Warwick [England] on 25 March 1472.2 He was created 1st Earl of Salisbury [England] on 25 March 1472.2 He held the office of Great Chamberlain on 20 May 1472.3 On 8 February 1477/78 he was attainted by Act of Parliament, and forfeited all his estates and titles.2

Children of Sir George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence and Lady Isabel Neville

Citations

  1. [S8] BP1999 volume 1, page 16. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S8]
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 136. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  3. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 260. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 137.

Anne Plantagenet

F, #101638, b. 10 August 1439, d. 12 January 1476
Last Edited=22 May 2004
Consanguinity Index=2.36%
     Anne Plantagenet was born on 10 August 1439 at Fotheringhay Castle, Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, England.1 She was the daughter of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York and Lady Cecily Neville. She married, firstly, Henry de Holand, 2nd Duke of Exeter, son of John de Holand, 1st Duke of Exeter and Anne Stafford, before 30 July 1447.2 She and Henry de Holand, 2nd Duke of Exeter were divorced on 12 November 1472.1 She married, secondly, Sir Thomas St. Leger in 1472/73.1 She died on 12 January 1476 at age 36 in childbirth.1 She was buried at St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.1
      From before 30 July 1447, her married name became de Holand. From 1473, her married name became St. Leger. As a result of her marriage, Anne Plantagenet was styled as Duchess of Exeter.

Child of Anne Plantagenet and Henry de Holand, 2nd Duke of Exeter

Child of Anne Plantagenet and Sir Thomas St. Leger

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 134. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 97.

Elizabeth Plantagenet

F, #101639, b. 22 April 1444, d. between 7 January 1503 and 3 May 1504
Last Edited=17 Jan 2007
Consanguinity Index=2.36%
     Elizabeth Plantagenet was born on 22 April 1444 at Rouen, Caux, France.1 She was the daughter of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York and Lady Cecily Neville. She married John de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, son of William de la Pole, 1st Duke of Suffolk and Alice Chaucer, circa August 1461.2 She died between 7 January 1503 and 3 May 1504.2 She was buried at Wingfield Church, Wingfield, Suffolk, England.2
      From circa August 1461, her married name became de la Pole.2

Children of Elizabeth Plantagenet and John de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 134. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 135.

Margaret Plantagenet

F, #101640, b. 3 May 1446, d. 16 April 1503
Last Edited=29 Apr 2009
Consanguinity Index=2.36%
Margaret Plantagenet 1
     Margaret Plantagenet was born on 3 May 1446 at Fotheringhay Castle, Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, England.2 She was the daughter of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York and Lady Cecily Neville. She married Charles de Valois, Duc de Bourgogne, Brabant, Limburg et Luxembourg, Graaf van Vlaanderen Holland en Zeeland, son of Philippe III de Valois, Duc de Bourgogne and Isabel de Aviz, on 3 July 1468 at Damme, Flanders, Belgium.2 She died on 16 April 1503 at age 56 at Malines, Belgium.2 She died on 23 November 1503 at age 57. She was buried at Church of the Cordeliers, Malines, Belgium.2

Citations

  1. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 135. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.